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NEVER WEAR BUNKER GEAR ON A WATER RESCUE - WANNA KNOW WHY? READ BELOW!

BAD BAD IDEA

BAD BAD IDEA

Friday, December 27, 2013  One of my Fire Service colleagues, Chief Norm RookerChief (Ret.), Ouray County Colorado EMS, recently commented on a Discussion posting on LinkedIn, What Keeps You Up at Night?  I think it’s really pertinent stuff that needs to “stay afloat” in cyberspace.  Here’s what Norm had to say:

What keeps me up at night has little to do with finances, although that is a constant factor for all of us in command. Or public opinion. We must constantly work to let our constituents, the taxpayers, know what they are getting for their tax dollars. That is just a fact of life for those of us in command.

No, what keeps me up at night is wondering whether I, as a chief officer and leader have done everything possible to ensure that my men and women come home from the rescue situation that we have been called out for. Realistic and appropriate training and just as important, realistic SOGs are what keep me up.

With the recent flooding events in the US and around the world, most recently in Colorado, it comes to flood response. Both the slow rising water type of flooding and flash floods. The plain truth is that because rescue services have come to span the entire spectrum of disasters, both man-made and natural, have fallen to fire service. Like the “A-Team” of the rescue world, the fire service is frequently the first agency most jurisdictions respond for these events. As such,  it is up to us as chief officers to actually see that our people are both properly trained and equipped to respond to those emergencies.

Now no one can be the McGyver of every possible rescue scenario. But the plain fact of the matter is that according to NFPA statistics, a firefighter is four times more likely to lose his or her life in a water rescue response then fighting a fire.  Why?  Because we train and equip our people to do their primary job, fire suppression. A single set of bunker gear and helmet can run over two grand now for a firefighter. We emphasize the care and maintenance of this last ditch line of defense for battling the Red Devil.

However, the unintended consequence of this expense and training is that our firefighters, both paid and volunteer, will wear their “suit of armor” for every response, not just fire suppression.  The result is that we see over and over again firefighters responding to flood emergencies wearing bunker gear.  The very equipment designed to keep a firefighter alive in a structure fire, will the vast majority of the time kill him or her in the water environment, especially moving water.

Firefighters engaged in water survival training while wearing PPE


Bunker pants act as sea anchors in moving water.   Not sure about that, contact the Denver FD and inquire if they have made any changes to their SOGs, which were no different than the national norm for most FDs, after the events of the August 17, 2000.  On that date, an emergency response to a flash flood resulted in the loss of life of a firefighter who was swept down a storm drain while attempting to rescue a woman being swept in down a city street in knee deep water.  The FF was wearing bunker gear and was swept off his feet by the swift moving current.

We should make it a point to send our firefighters out in duty uniforms, not turnout gear when responding to water emergencies as a minimum. An absolute minimum. Not sure about that? Google swimming in bunker gear. The experiments done by a fire department with an experienced swimmer and member of their department’s dive rescue team showed that within a minute that experienced water rescuer was pulled under by his equipment when he attempted to swim across a swimming pool and, if it were not for the presence of a rescue swimmer, that firefighter and highly trained swimmer would have lost his life.

Bunker gear will hold a significant amount of air and keep us afloat should we fall into still water with it and quickly roll over onto our back with a minimum of movement. However if we flounder, flail or attempt to swim while wearing bunker gear we quickly dispel all of the air, thus losing our buoyancy and will be pulled under by our “protective” gear. The moral, don’t wear bunker gear for water rescue response.   Two departments to go to for SOGs would be the Denver FD, Colorado and the Charlotte FD, North Carolina.

Excellent points Norm! The kind of stuff that doesn’t get near enough attention, except perhaps in places that have recognized the potential ahead of time (the proactive folks) or that have lost one of their own to swift water (the reactive folks). Water rescue, especially swift water rescue, requires specialized training and equipment to be done safely, effectively, and efficiently.


The really frightening part is that water is everywhere and so is the potential for flashfloods. The “urbanization” of the United States, e.g., the laying of asphalt and concrete for roads and parking lots, etc., now creates the potential for flash floods and swift water incidents just about anywhere in the USA. All it takes is a couple of inches of rain in a short period of time and BINGO!  Where that water would have been absorbed into the soil previously, it now cascades down these man-made “concrete canyons” in our cities and towns.

Example of U.S. Coast Guard-Approved Type III PFD


In addition to “ditching” the structural PPE on water responses, every fire company should have a U.S. Coast Guard approved Type III or higher Personal Floatation Device (PFD) available for each member of the responding crew. The donning of the PFD before entering the hazard area should be akin to donning your structural PPE at a structure fire: No PFD, No access.

http://fireemsleaderpro.org/tag/water-rescue/


 

 

 

 

NIOSH Respirators User Notice

Monday, December 2, 2013  Issue Date: November 27, 2013

From: Roland Berry Ann, Acting Chief, Technology Evaluation Branch, National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory

Subject: Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) Testing for NIOSH CBRN Respirator Approvals

BACKGROUND: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) employs the Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s (ECBC) Test Laboratory to conduct the Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) testing portion of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) testing. These services support the NIOSH respirator approvals providing CBRN protections.

On November 18, 2013, ECBC notified NIOSH of errors with some of its test data. ECBC’s internal assessment of these data indicates that concentrations of the CWAs used in testing were less than that required by NIOSH test procedures.a Testing conducted during the period of July 2012 through October 2013 is affected. The majority of the affected testing was conducted in support of NFPA 1981, 2013 edition approvals in process.

AFFECTED PROTECTIONS: NIOSH evaluations for granting approval for CBRN protection require a broad range of testing in order to ensure protection at the levels indicated on the approval labels.

The particular tests in question relate only to the ability of the respirator configurations to protect against CWAs. The affected respirator configurations will provide all of the non-CBRN protections for which the NIOSH approvals are issued. The non-CBRN protections are verified by NIOSH-conducted tests and evaluations. These NIOSH-conducted tests have not been compromised by the errors discovered in the CWA testing.

However, the affected respirator configurations MUST NOT BE USED TO PROVIDE PROTECTION AGAINST CWA HAZARDS until retesting has verified that these protections are provided.


REQUESTED MANUFACTURERS’ ACTIONS:

On November 22, 2013, NIOSH requested that manufacturers immediately stop labeling any affected respirator configurations as CBRN approved, and notify customers who may have purchased the affected respirator configurations.

These testing errors adversely affect pending and/or completed approvals conducted for Avon, Draeger, Immediate Response Technologies, MSA, and Scott Safety. Since receiving the approval, Scott Safety has delivered respirator configurations affected by these testing errors.

Their Technical Bulletin, Scott Safety End User Notification: NIOSH CBRN Testing will be available at: https://www.scottsafety.com/en/us/Pages/servicecommunication.aspx
Scott Technical Support: 1-800-247-7257 or 1-800-AIR-PAKS
ScottTechSupport@tycoint.com

Scott Safety will notify you within the next ten business days if you have been identified as having affected respirator configurations. IF YOU ARE IN DOUBT about whether your respirator configuration is affected, please contact Scott Safety immediately.


NIOSH ACTIONS:

NIOSH met with ECBC on November 19, 2013 to discuss the impact of the errors on current and pending NIOSH CBRN respirator approvals. As a result, ECBC has temporarily halted operations and, in agreement with NIOSH, will validate all test procedures before resuming operations. CWA re-testing at ECBC of all respirators previously submitted for approval for which CWA testing was conducted during the July 2012 through October 2013 period is expected to resume with an expedited schedule by January 2014 and be completed by April 1, 2014.

NIOSH and ECBC regret the impacts of this situation. Both NIOSH and ECBC are committing additional resources to increase testing capacity to expedite the re-testing schedule as much as feasible. We are working together to resume ECBC operations as quickly as possible and to incorporate additional checks and balances to ensure that this situation will not be repeated.

In addition to continuing to work with ECBC to complete CWA testing and coordinate with Safety Equipment Institute to issue CBRN SCBA approvals as expeditiously as possible, NIOSH is:

1.       Working with all five affected manufacturers to expedite identification and NIOSH receipt of appropriate configurations to be re-tested and expedite resolution of the current issues,

2.      Working with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to mitigate the impact of these delays in completing NFPA 1981, 2013 Edition approvals and to enable NFPA to take appropriate actions, and

3.      Working with the Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency– Assistance to Firefighter Grant Program Office to discuss the need to extend the availability of the funds for equipment grants.

NIOSH will keep all interested parties informed until this matter is resolved.

 


aURLs for the NIOSH Standard Testing Procedures for the chemical warfare agent tests conducted on CBRN respirators, both air-purifying and atmosphere-supplying.
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/stps/pdfs/RCT-ASR-CBRN-STP-0200-0201.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/stps/pdfs/RCT-CBRN-APR-STP-0350.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/stps/pdfs/RCT-CBRN-APR-STP-0351.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/stps/pdfs/CET-APRS-STP-CBRN-0450.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/stps/pdfs/CET-APRS-STP-CBRN-0451.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/stps/pdfs/NPPTL-STP-CBRN-PAPR-0550.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/stps/pdfs/NPPTL-STP-CBRN-PAPR-0551.pdf

 



 

 

 

 

CLOSE THE DOOR PUBLIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGN

Thursday, October 10, 2013  Please share this valuable life saving presentation! This module was created for you to share with your communities, and create more awareness of the importance of CLOSING THE DOOR! http://firetrainingtoolbox.com/modules/closedoor/index.html



 

 

 

 

What's In YOUR Next Vehicle Fire? VIDEO (Firefighter Survival)

Video 2

Friday, September 6, 2013  When responding to vehicle fires:
Protect the scene so some clown doesn't drive into you or your members.
Chock the vehicle (the one on fire) wheels when appropriate-so it doesn't roll or drive off.

WHY?

(watch the below videos)
in case YOUR car fire has 02 cylinders in it, meth lap supplies, propane tanks-and other assorted goodies. Even if it doesn't, expect it to-and also remember the issues related to exploding bumpers, hood struts etc.
It's a vehicle fire. Don't get hurt. Put it out. Go home.
 
WHAT HAPPENED IN THE ABOVE VIDEOS?
 
A burning car exploded in Colorado Springs Wednesday afternoon, sending pieces of the car into the air.
Colorado Springs police said the car erupted in flames after it was rear-ended by another car on Highway 115 and Cheyenne Mountain Boulevard.
Shortly after a fire truck arrived to put out the fire, the first explosion happened.  A second, smaller explosion occurred shortly after that. The explosions were caused by oxygen canisters in the trunk of the burning car, police said.
The man whose car was rear-ended suffered injuries to his back. A realtive told 7NEWS he suffered a broken vertebrae.
The driver suspected of rear-ending the first car was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of drugs.  Police identified him as Joshua Morgan. Two police cruisers and one Colorado Springs Fire Department fire truck were damaged during one of the explosions by flying debris. There were no injuries to emergency responders.
 
 
 

 

 

 

THE FUTURE IS HERE! LEARN, LIVE IT, LOVE IT - SCIENCE MEETS THE STREETS - UL!

ULFirefighterSafety Video

Thursday, August 1, 2013  Check this out.... much more to come on this.


 

 

 

 

ALIVE TRAINING

Monday, July 22, 2013  Have you checked out the "ALIVE" Training Tool? It is FREE. Read on.


As you are well aware, many factors contribute to the significant number of Firefighter deaths and injuries, but perhaps most troubling may be the fact that many Firefighters were probably not aware of advancements in firefighting methods - that could have changed these tragic outcomes.




With the support from DHS/USFA Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, in collaboration with the FDNY, the Chicago Fire Department (CFD) and the Bloomington (Minn.) Fire Department (BFD), NYU-Poly scientists conducted research to develop new web-based, interactive training (ALIVE) to assist in the dissemination, training, and retention of new firefighting information and techniques.




You can read more about the success of this research in the article to be published in upcoming August Issue of FireRescue Magazine. The online version is available HERE:

http://www.firefighternation.com/index.php?q=article/training-0/alive-training-tool-game-changer . 




NOTE: The research will also be featured this week at Firehouse Expo Conference (July 26, 10:15 to 11:45 am, Room 318) and IAFC's FRI (Fire Rescue International) Conference (August 16, 1 to 2:30 pm, Track: SHW-13).



Two modules of ALIVE: Wind-Driven High-Rise Fires and Fires in Residential Lightweight Construction, have been released nationwide to the fire service community free of cost. The iOS and Android applications of this training are also available at www.poly.edu/fire.




The Chicago and the Cleveland Fire Department's are currently using ALIVE to train their firefighters with the support of their training divisions. Your department can now take advantage of this advanced multimedia interactive training at no cost. The scientists from NYU-Poly will work with your training academies to build a customized ALIVE portal for your department.



If your fire department is interested in utilizing this scientifically tested and proven training, please have your Chief or Chief of Training contact the NYU-Poly Fire Research Group at fire@poly.edu.



Please visit www.poly.edu/fire for more information about this research and to access the ALIVE modules.



 

 

 

 

Fire Accountability App Is A Game Changer

Wednesday, June 19, 2013 

Tired of your tactical worksheets getting rained on; Velcro falling off of your Command Board tags; losing pieces to your magnet board?  Have you been searching for a real world solution to track personnel on your fire scenes?  With all of the new technology out there, there must be a better solution.  Fire Chief Bob Ruff (DBA Fire Seminars) has created an app that offers a practical solution to blending technology with tactics.  Fire Accountability is now available for download on the App Store and Google Play.

 

            The Fire Accountability app is a single screen, fully customizable, user friendly program designed for practical use on the fireground.  The app consists of a simple set up screen, where users can input their companies, select a benchmark alarm time, and add default email addresses for time-stamped logs to be delivered.  Set up takes about two minutes, then the app is ready for use on emergency scenes.  Upon arrival on an incident scene, the user simply selects the incident type.  Types include:  6 different residential structures, strip mall, big box, wildfire and dive rescue.  After selection, you will find a visual representation of the incident along with your pre-loaded companies, displayed as “drag and drop” icons on screen.  As you direct crews to divisions, simply drag and drop their icon into that division on screen.  Every move that you make during the incident is time-stamp logged behind the scenes.  On the bottom of the screen, you’ll find several tactical reminder/indicator buttons.  As you complete tasks like contact utilities or assign a safety officer, just tap the buttons and a check mark will display indicating task completion.  Sending a crew to the second floor for a primary search?  Tap the primary search button.  You’ll then be asked to select a floor, and a red slash will appear on that floor.  When companies report an all clear on a floor, the IC taps the all clear button, selects the floor and a red “X” will appear on that floor.  All of these features are designed to allow IC’s to know where every firefighter is located on every fire scene all the time, every time.  At a glance, locate all of your crews, and track tactical progress.

 

            Fire Accountability is also loaded with several alarms to keep you on track.  On every incident scene, you will find a running on scene timer on the top of the screen.  The app will sound benchmark alarms at the time intervals that you selected in set up.  When crews are dropped inside of a building, the “under roof” timer is automatically activated.  Once companies have been under roof for 20 minutes, their icons will flash blue and white.  Teams “camping out” in rehab?  After sitting in rehab for 30 minutes, icons will change to green.  Forget to contact utilities?  Five minutes after arriving on scene, the app will alarm to remind you to contact utilities.  For you rescue divers, the satellite image based dive rescue screen comes equipped with under water timers, and green/yellow/red color change indicators for tracking air supply.  These are just a few of the great timer features included in Fire Accountability.

 

            Whether you are a member of the smallest rural department or the largest metro department, Fire Accountability will prove to be a game changer for Fire Command.  At half the cost of the other Command/Accountability apps on the market, it is worth checking out.  For more information, visit www.fireaccountability.com

 

 

 

 

Eliminating Fire Department Water Tanker Rollovers is Goal of New NTTC/DOT Video

Tuesday, June 18, 2013  On November 11, 2012, Firefighter Mark Haudenschild II, 26, was killed when the water tanker he was driving overturned while he was  responding to a brush fire near Fort Wayne, Indiana. He left a wife and two young children. He was a volunteer with the Washington Township Volunteer Fire Department serving his community.

Over the past several years, too many firefighters have been killed or injured in water tanker/ tender  rollovers while responding to emergencies.  National Tank Truck Carriers ( NTTC) has produced a new version of the Cargo Tank Rollover Prevention Video it developed with the U.S. Department of Transportation to help educate water tanker drivers on the special characteristics of tank truck vehicles and the actions they can take to avoid rollovers.

“While this DVD was originally developed for commercial tank truck drivers, the principles of tank truck vehicle dynamics, road challenges,  and   safe  driving  practices  it presents are equally applicable  to water tankers  used in emergency response,” said Jim Shaeffer, president of McKenzie Tank Lines, Tallahassee FL,  and Chairman of National Tank Truck Carriers, Inc.  “I know we will use this DVD in our outreach to firefighters and LEPCs (Local Emergency Planning Councils) in the areas in which we operate.  It is especially appropriate  that we introduce this material at our Annual Safety Conference in Denver.  Safety is the core mission of NTTC.”

Fire Department water tanker rollovers are not a new phenomenon. The Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a report on Firefighter Deaths from Tanker Truck Rollovers in 2001.  That report said there had been 62 deaths from water tanker rollovers from 1977-1999. The report  did not include the injuries.  The  ability to track media and other reports on such crashes  today shows that they continue to be a real issue of concern. Firefighters continue to be killed and injured in these usually preventable crashes.

The original 20-minute video was produced by the U.S. Department of Transportation with input from National Tank Truck Carriers in 2010 following increased industry and government concerns about the number of tank truck rollovers. It focuses on:  Tank truck vehicle design; cargo/load  factors; highway factors; and driver factors.  The video features real tank truck drivers who share their experiences, different types of tank truck equipment and detailed graphics,  and  various highway challenges.  The video has been translated into French, Spanish and Japanese. 

The video was based in part on information developed in 2007 in a detailed cargo tank rollover report prepared for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) by Battelle. Among information in that report was that over 75 percent of rollovers are caused by a driver’s action or inaction, the majority of rollovers are single vehicle crashes that occur on straight dry roadways (not exit ramps as is often thought,) and that about one-quarter of tanker rollovers involve straight trucks where the tank sits on the truck body. 

"I am delighted that we can help extend the very important safety message of the Cargo Tank Rollover Prevention Video to the fire service," said Tim Butters, Deputy Administrator of the USDOT's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration and former chief fire officer with the Fairfax City (Virginia) Fire Department.  "We continue to see vehicle rollovers involving fire department apparatus, particularly tenders/tankers used for transporting large volumes of water.  Understanding how to safety operate these vehicles will help reduce rollover accidents.  Vehicle accidents continue to be one of the leading causes of firefighter injuries and fatalities.  I will strongly encourage my colleagues in the fire and emergency response service to include this training video in their emergency vehicle driver/operator safety training and driver refresher programs.  Emergency responder's provide a critical public safety service to their communities, and we want to return home safely."

“We have been pleased with the response to the original video and hope that this version directed to the fire community will become a tool for training drivers who perform such a valuable service to us all,”  said Dan Furth,  National Tank Truck Carriers president.  “The DVD is free for downloading from our website www.tanktruck.org and we encourage everyone to help spread this safety outreach to anyone who can benefit from it. Many of our NTTC members already work with fire departments in their operating areas and we know that  this  information will help in the training they provide.”

A free copy of the  DVD can be obtained for review and reproduction by contacting NTTC at 703/838-1960, by email to  nttcstaff@tanktruck.org, or by mail to NTTC, 950 N. Glebe Rd., Arlington VA 22203. If large amounts of copies are desired, we can put people  in touch with our video company for obtaining copies. None of this material is copyright protected.  National Tank Truck Carriers, Inc. is the trade association of the tank truck industry. 

Note to editors:  For more information, contact:  John Conley, jconley@tanktruck.org, 703/216-0449.

The Battelle Report referenced can be found on the FMCSA website: http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/safety-security/hazmat/cargo-tank-roll-stability-finalreport-april2007.pdf

PHOTO CAPTION:  NTTC Vice Chairman Dean Kaplan of K-Limited Carrier, Toledo OH and NTTC Safety Council Chairman Becky Perlaky of Kenan Advantage Group, Canton OH, introduced a DVD offered by NTTC to help eliminate fire department water tanker rollover crashes. The DVD is available at no cost and for reproduction at www.tanktruck.org


Close up of DVD

PHMSA Deputy Administrator Tim Butters can be reached at tim.butters@dot.gov 202-366-4461.



 

 

 

 

TRAINING BULLETIN - STEP POTENTIAL AND ELECTROCUTIONS

Saturday, June 15, 2013  GROUND GRADIENT

Ground Gradient is a term used to describe the electrical field established around the current’s point of entry into the ground from SSG’S, downed conductor, or other source (for example, backhoe boom or truck outriggers) into the earth.

1.  The electrical field created in these situations dissipates as the distance from the point of entry increases. The dissipation creates a difference in potential between any given two points in the electrical field. (See example illustration).

2.  The difference in potential decreases rapidly as the distance from the point of entry increases.

 

STEP POTENTIAL

Step potential describes the difference in potential that exists between two points in a ground gradient.

1.  The difference in potential between a person’s feet can cause current to flow through a person’s body.

2.  Step potential is usually negligible, except for where a downed conductor or severe fault to ground exists.

3.  Step potential can be eliminated by keeping the feet together or by keeping only one foot in contact with the earth at a time.

 

TOUCH POTENTIAL

A touch potential is caused when a person creates a current path to ground by touching an energized conductor, or ground lead when a fault exists. Touch potentials also exist when equipment is in contact with an energized conductor.

1.  Workers on the ground and on a pole encounter touch potential more than step potential.

2.  Touch potential is normally more severe than step potential due to the higher difference in potential encountered.



 

 

 

 

THE I-STAIR - A NEW BUILDING CONSTRUCTION HAZARD

Wednesday, January 23, 2013  Attached is info on a new type of stair construction for residential buildings, and a safety bulletin that I put out for my department. The stairs are constructed using 2x4s for the main support. The triangles shown hold the stair riser and tread in place. The metal on the bottom of the tread and riser is essentially a gusset plate, similar to truss gusset plates. I have spoken with the inventor of the products and received the info from him. According to what he has told me, if the stair is in a main floor to second floor configuration, the bottom needs to have drywall. If it is coming from the basement in an unfinished area, no drywall or other protection in required. The entire stair assembly is manufactured in a factory and shipped to the jobsite.



 

 

 

 

GO NO GO DECISIONMAKING - www.FireTrainingToolBox.com

FireTraningToolBox.com Video

Tuesday, January 22, 2013  Thanks to our friends at www.FireTrainingToolBox.com for sharing this drill and video with us on GO - NO GO Decision Making.  Check it out!





 

 

 

 

Is Your Fire Prevention Message Up To Date?

Tuesday, October 9, 2012  As most firefighters should know this week is National Fire Prevention Week . I am sure many of you are out spreading the message of Fire Prevention this week. I would like to say thank you for serving your communities and  you will probably never know how many life’s were truly saved by your wonderful dedication to your communities.

So since it is  Fire Prevention Week this post will be about this years Fire Prevention theme in the context of our modern fire environment.

The NFPA’s Fire Prevention Week is October 7-13, 2012. This year’s theme is “Have Two Ways Out” and focuses on the importance of fire escape planning and practice in the home.

In 2010, U.S. fire departments responded to 369,500 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,350 civilian injuries, 2,640 civilian deaths, and $6.9 billion in direct damage. One home structure was reported every 85 seconds in 2010.

READ MORE HERE: http://greenmaltese.com/2012/10/is-your-fire-prevention-message-up-to-date/





 

 

 

 

SIP WALLS - DO YOU UNDERSTAND THEM?

Wednesday, June 27, 2012  Many firefighters are becoming aware hazards associated with engineered  wood products such as wooden I beam. However very few know that now there are products such as SIP that are made of OSB and foam that are structural members! These products are starting to be widely used to become more energy efficient and become greener. This write up from Green Maltese will examine  SIP from a firefighting perspective. This is just one of many hazards facing firefighters in modern construction please read and share with your crews.


http://greenmaltese.com/2012/06/what-are-sips/

 

 

 

 

BASEMENT FIRE TRAINING PRESENTATION - FREE!

Thursday, April 5, 2012  Engine Company 22 and Green Maltese present: Basement Fires A free online Training Module. To access the presentation visit: http://engineco22.net/modules/basement/index.html

 

 

 

 

HELP! WANTED

Saturday, February 11, 2012   When it comes to efficient and safe operations, communications is the key. One of the more  frequent requests received by FFCC is for information, plans, legislation, and presentations concerning this topic. 

So, if you or your department is in possession of any of the above, or even knows a link to a state or local site that you find helpful, please pass it along.

Please send an email to barryfurey@yahoo.com along with your favorite links and/or a copy of the file(s) in question. PDF files are preferred, but I can convert from other formats. The goal is to create a readily available resource for readers.

 

 

 

 
 
 

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THE TOP 5
GET THESE RIGHT EVERY TIME

Engine

1. GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE
2. LAY A SUPPLY LINE
3. PULL AN ATTACK LINE
4. PROTECT MEANS OF EGRESS
5. CONFINE AND EXTINGUISH

Truck

1. GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE
2. POSITION PROPERLY
3. PROVIDE ACCESS
4. SEARCH FOR VICTIMS
5. LET THE SMOKE OUT

Ambulance

1. GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE
2. A,B,C'S
3. ASSESS THE PATIENT
4. PROVIDE CARE
5. PACKAGE AND TRANSPORT

THERE ARE NO SECOND CHANCES
COURTESY OF THE COLLEGE PARK VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT


Firefighters, Smoke, & Heart Attacks

Click for a great Powerpoint

The 20 Structural Watch Out Situations
(Click on the bold to link to PDF attached files)

The idea behind establishing the structural watch out situations is to aid the firefighter in recognizing a present or developing hazardous situation that may endanger themselves or others. When these situations start appearing (one may not be a problem, but five or ten sure are) on the incident a change of strategy, tactics, or simply re-evaluating risk versus gain will become obvious, the idea is to recognize them early on.

It is impractical to think that the average firefighter or incident commander is going to reference these 20 situations in the heat of battle, therefore the preferred way of integrating this information is to “pre-load” it. Two easy areas to pre-load the watch outs are in routine trainings and by simply posting them in the day room for discussion. Also think about incorporating these into the after incident review so as to start reinforcing their use.

These are taken from a workshop designed to manage risk created by Quinn MacLeod titled “Risk Management at the Company Level”. Any comments would be appreciated. Reference www.integrated-firesolutions.com
1. 360 view of fire and size up not performed.
2. Uninformed on strategy, tactics, fire conditions, and hazards.
3. Instructions and assignments not clear.
4. The incident is progressing poorly.
5. Transitioning from offensive to defensive or visa versa.
6. The structure has been evacuated by the public and is confirmed.
7. Water supply is unreliable.
8. Searching without a hose line or tag line.
9. Working above or below the fire.
10. Attempting to attack the fire from a ground ladder.
11. Interior building configuration makes escape to safe areas difficult.
12. Upon entering the structure you encounter heavy smoke conditions and / or high heat.
13. Unable to quickly locate the seat of the fire.
14. Unfamiliar with the building and / or its contents.
15. The building has had numerous alterations.
16. Operating on the roof with only one means of egress.
17. 15 minutes have elapsed & the interior fire fight continues.
18. Environmental conditions are extreme.
19. The incident scene is dark.
20. Mentally and / or physically tired.

NOTE: Numerous versions of these structural watch outs exist, therefore these are not all-inclusive.

 


DO 1st DUE "COMMAND ROLES"
SOMETIMES CONFUSE YOU?
=Did you go to NIMS Class and find yourself "just a bit" more
confused than before?
=Did you only THINK you knew what "plain English" meant before taking the latest NIMS, ICS or COMMAND COURSE?
=Does this whole "ICS THING" have you needing counseling?


PERHAPS WE CAN HELP?
(click on the below FIRE-SUV ! )

IT'S ONLY A CAR FIRE??
DONT BE.......


CLICK THE ABOVE CAR FIRE FOR AN EXCELLENT PDF FROM
THE NASSAU COUNTY, N.Y. FIRE SERVICE ACADEMY

GOOD VIDEO TO SHOW HOW YOU CAN EASILY GET HURT
AT SUCH A ROUTINE CALL
Click the image below

DRAMATIC HIGHWAY BLOCKING VIDEO=
APPARATUS STRUCK & TOTALLED

MESQUITE (Texas) FF CLOSE CALL

All four ffs were transported to the hospital and all were released within 6 hours of the incident. The one ff that got into the cab last has not returned to work as of 8/20/2007 do to the injuries received. He is expected to make a full recovery. The FF that stumbled out of the cab on the driver's side was ok after being checked out at the hospital. Neither of the FFs in the back had time to sit down and get belted into their seats before the collision. The Driver Engineer and the Captain were both belted in their seats at the time of the accident. The crew received another call for service and were preparing to respond when the accident occurred. The A post where the Captain sits was completed detached at the roof line. The Captain jumped out of the front window after the accident to check on the occupants of the semi. No one in the semi was hurt. The pumper has been totaled. As you can see in the video it got bent pretty bad.

 

The unit is a 1998 Quality Spartan 1500 gpm pumper.

 

WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS
Here's a powerpoint presentation used for situational awareness, w/ the risk management graphic overlayed
on a Cramer Fire picture.

(Click the photo for the PowerPoint Program)

........CNG VEHICLES DRIVING AROUND IN YOUR AREA? ABSOLUTELY!

CLICK THE BELOW LOGO FOR A CLOSE CALL.....
PowerPoint Program Involving a vehicle and CNG

Is Firefighting Hazardous?
Just show this slide program (click below) to the next person
who doesn't "get it" when it comes to the HAZARDS we deal with at just a
SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING.

FREE DOWNLOAD!
FIREFIGHTERS AND HEART ATTACKS

CLICK BELOW for a presentation that links fire fighting and cardiovascular disease with data from the NIOSH Fire Fighter Fatality investigations program. This presentation was delivered by NIOSH's Dr. Thomas Hales, MD, MPH at the DHS Office of Grants and Training Meeting on Jan 8, 2007. The findings and conclusion in this presentation have not been formally disseminated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and should not be construed to represent agency determination or policy.

WHAT PART OF.....
CIVILIAN DRIVERS DO NOT SEE OR HEAR US RESPONDING......

DO WE NOT UNDERSTAND?

bad driver
Odd's are-CLOWNS LIKE THE ABOVE DO NOT HEAR US RESPONDING unless they stick their head OUT of the window....because they are simply too busy doing "other stuff" while driving.

SOLUTION
Cell phone driver
....just frick'n STOP when the light is RED or at a STOP sign...

....and MAKE SURE

"THEY" see us and GIVE US the intersection.

(...and even when we DO have a green light-WATCH OUT!)

"If you THINK an APPARATUS vs CIVILIAN crash is worth the risk...

.....you have never had one"
stop light

(CLICK THE STOP SIGN FOR ANOTHER APPARATUS VS CIVILIAN CLOSE CALL VIDEO)

 

VAN EXPLODES!

Firefighters: BUNKER GEAR AND FULL PPE*


* Why? Ever seen a Firefighter at a vehicle fire that isn't fully protected? Of course you have. IMAGINE if a Firefighter approached this van without FULL PPE?? This was an tremendous explosion at a minivan.

From the State Patrol, driver of 1994 Town & Country minivan was waved to pull over by another car. Upon looking in her rear view mirror she saw smoke/flames. Her and the passenger had to jump over some flames to get clear. Vehicle was well involved when we brought it up on camera. Within a couple of minutes of that, we saw a huge fireball blow out the drivers side of the vehicle, about 30 feet wide and 40-50 feet high. No report of injuries. The semi driving through the fireball was a bit smoked, but didn't catch fire. Appears to be a BLEVE from the fuel tank. I've seen literally hundreds of cars burn, but never seen one "blow up" like this. Certainly a great reminder to wear full bunker gear at car fires. Click here for the video.

incoming......!!!!!
BEWARE THE STRUT!

You may remember a few years ago, in FIREHOUSE MAGAZINE, we did a story of a Firefighter seriously injured by an exploding STRUT from the hood of a car that was on fire.
Below is a message from his Chief, in Windsor Locks, CT.

In this latest clip and CLOSE CALL, a Taurus wagon was fully involved. A couple of minutes after Firefighters got water on it and during overhaul, watch at 07:26:40 and you'll see a smokey item roll across by the median. This was a strut from the lift gate, had shot out just missing a FF in the smoke and bounced off either the Troopers squad or the civilian's before rolling to median. CONSIDER THE FORCE of it going that distance.

(CLICK "INCOMING" FOR THE VIDEO)
incoming
On Sunday November 21, 2004, the Windsor Locks Fire Department responded to a reported car fire. Upon arrival the fire was confined to the engine compartment. During gaining access to the engine compartment, one of my firefighters had just released the hood safety latch when the hood shock strut exploded and fired into my firefighter, striking him in his upper thigh and piercing completely through his leg and bunker pants with the approximate 18 inch long strut.

I wish to make other departments mindful that these struts are gas filled and are common on General Motor products, in particular Buicks that I am aware of. In my 30 plus years on the fire department this is the first
time I had ever heard of one these gas filled struts exploding like this.

Fire Service Operational Safety at Deconstruction and Demolition Sites

(Click the above picture for this EXCELLENT Powerpoint program)
Provided to FireFighterCloseCalls.com by Chris Naum

 

RECRUIT FF LODD INVESTIGATION REPORT

BALTIMORE CITY LIVE FIRE TRAINING
 
FEBRUARY 9, 2007
 
This independent investigation into the February death of Baltimore Fire Department recruit Racheal Wilson puts much of the blame on her instructor and other midlevel fire commanders, three of whom have already been fired. In the below report prepared for the Mayor, the investigation concluded Wilson wasn't ready for the training exercise that killed her. She had failed agility tests and entered a burning building wearing old gear that failed to protect her from intense heat. Wilson died after she was trapped in a rowhouse that had been deliberately set on fire. Click below for the report and related documents.
Baltimore Training LODD Final Report 8-23-07
Baltimore Training LODD Final Report Appendices


Temporary Traffic Control Checklist
(Click to enlarge)

FIREFIGHTERS....Saving Our Own:
The Powell Doctrine and Interior Fire Operations
Yours...Mine...and OUR Sacred OBLIGATION.
Submitted by Eric Lamar-a veteran Firefighter with a long career history of working toward Firefighter safety and survival. The Firefighter and Fire Officers job is to protect all of our members by making smart decisions under tough circumstances...that's the challenge....
The General & Firefighting? Firefighter LODD's? Who NEEDS You To Return Home? Read on...

(Click the photo below for the details)



KNOW YOUR ENEMY!
FIRES IN SINGLE FAMILY DWELLINGS!*


*As the Late Frank Brannigan used to say: "THE BUILDING IS YOUR ENEMY.. KNOW YOUR ENEMY!"

Take a look at the video from Loudoun County (VA's) Chief Fire Marshal Keith Brower about a pair of fires that helps illustrate a problem firefighters across the country are dealing with. One of the fires was in an older home. While that fire reached the attic, the house is still standing.
The other fire was in a more modern home. It burned to the ground. Chief Brower says homes built over the last two decades use lighter lumber and connection plates that can easily separate during a fire. He says a combination of faster fire spread and a greater collapse potential often keeps firefighters from getting into the house and stopping the fires. Brower has long been a champion on the issues related to new construction as well as residential sprinklers to save civilians...and FIREFIGHTERS LIVES.

CLICK THE ABOVE PHOTO TO VIEW THE VIDEO COURTESY OF DAVE STATTER www.WUSA9.com

FIREFIGHTER STAFFING, SAFETY &
COMPANY OPERATIONS...




Fire Station Gear Rack
".....BUNKER GEAR IS CRITICAL...BUT IT TAKES FIREFIGHTERS
IN THAT GEAR, AT THE SCENE, TO SAFELY
& EFFECTIVELY DO THIS JOB...."


This is a short film that visually demonstrates the dangers and challenges faced by firefighters during a structure fire. This film serves to educate recruit firefighters, elected officials, city hall dwellers and the public in fire department operations. It demonstrates the need for a safe aggressive interior attack coupled with adequate resources in order to save lives and reduce property loss.

(Click the above photo to view)

 

FIREFIGHTER SAFETY & SURVIVAL TRAINING TIME ? ?



Need a little something to "wake up the gang"
at the Firehouse?
(Click the above picture for a great Powerpoint that was submitted to us using some of the photos off our GALLERY Section!)

Hydrogen Safety for First Responders


DOE's Introduction to Hydrogen Safety for First Responders is a Web-based course that provides an "awareness level" overview of hydrogen for fire, law enforcement, and emergency medical personnel. This multimedia tutorial acquaints first responders with hydrogen, its basic properties, and how it compares to other familiar fuels; hydrogen use in fuel cells for transportation and stationary power; potential hazards; initial protective actions should a responder witness an incident; and supplemental resources including videos, supporting documents, and links relevant to hydrogen safety. 

 

FIREFIGHTERS & SEATBELTS VIDEO...it just ain't that tough!!

Thanks to the Neffsville (PA) Fire Company, who takes great pride in their fire prevention program. In one of their programs, they produced a PSA Video that appear in one of the local movie theaters. We thought that our Seat Belt PSA could be of use to fire & EMS members who visit FireFighterCloseCalls.com.
(Click the Image to download the video)

Fire Truck loses Control

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION!

THINK YOU HAVE SEEN IT ALL?

Not Getting Along With The Cops In Your Area?

The Fire and Law Chiefs in Monterey County California have come up with the following guideline for
operating on highways and rural as well as city streets. THANKS for their willingness to share this with us!
(Click Below)

SEAT BELTS?

CAN PREVENT GETTING EJECTED

(CLICK ABOVE FOR THE WILDLAND SEATBELT VIDEO)

 

2007 New Year’s Resolutions: Sweat the Small Stuff

 

William Carey for www.FireFighterCloseCalls.com

 

In 2006 104 fire department personnel died in the line of duty. Regarding the always present prescription to the majority of line of duty deaths, all we can say about this proverbial dead horse is:

 

“Slow both you and your rig down”

“Exercise”

“Eat healthily”

“Have yearly physicals”

 

Of these 104 deaths, a brief, non scientific collection concluded the following:

 

  • 12 deaths while specifically operating a hoseline.
  • 11 deaths while performing suppression operations.
  • 8 deaths specifically stating the member was trapped.
  • 7 deaths caused by, or related to, building collapse.
  • 5 deaths while specifically conducting searches.
  • 2 deaths while overhauling, related to building collapse.
  • 1 death specifically stating the member was disoriented.
  • 1 death involving the incident commander during a working incident.
  • 1 death specifically stating the deployment of a rapid intervention crew in the LODD details.

 

Some of these figures are one in the same, such as where the firefighter operating a hoseline falls into the basement as a result of a floor collapse. The point to come away with is that even if we follow all of the safety procedures regarding driving and health, the fire service will unfortunately still have to deal with the death of brothers on the fireground. The only prescription we have available for this problem is to not make ourselves so safety conscious that we fall back to the days of fog streams through windows on the outside, but to encourage ourselves and the person we’re riding across from, to be better educated about “fighting” fire.

 

Below are six small, simple tips focused mostly towards the engine company, but beneficial to all of us. When you think about it they are all very simple, so simple that some are taken for granted. Start the New Year being a better firefighter. As a friend has been quoted, “A good firefighter knows how, a better firefighter knows why”.

 

In addition to these tips, take some time for some reading of the classic “Collapse of Burning Buildings. A Guide to Fireground Safety” (V. Dunn, Fire Engineering 1988) No matter what the day and technology presents us; fire is still destroying the building we are operating in.


 

Resolution No.1:

“This is my rifle. There are many like it but this one is mine. My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life.”

Following the U.S. Marine Corps’ Rifle Creed, whether you have a quint, a rescue engine, or just an engine, if you have to stretch a line, the basics don’t change. Make sure your members are familiar with what comes off your engine, how it is packed, how it is used, and how to solve any problems you might have with it. I put together a power point program about the initial stretch, and used the quote “How the first line goes, so goes the fire.” If we can’t get the line from point A to point B properly, then we’re all going to have problems.

 

Resolution No.2:

Combine Aggressiveness with Discipline.

In the words of Andrew Fredericks, “Good engine companies are aggressive but also disciplined. Disciplined engine companies ‘take the time to make the time.’ They take an extra 30 seconds to properly position the rig and estimate the handline stretch. They chock doors. They chase kinks. They see the big picture. Disciplined engine companies are deliberate, patient and professional. Is your engine company disciplined?”


 

Resolution No.3:

Be more than just a Driver.

Your engine at your paid job might only require you to push a button. What do you do when you’re not working? (Or vice versa) Take time to show an upcoming driver how to pump; practice odd situations; work out all of the “what if’s”.

 

Resolution No.4:

Practice taking a deep breath and THINKING.

In some circles, the train of thought is that we can’t enter a commercial occupancy unless we have a search line, even if we are advancing a handline. Take some time to go through your large commercial occupancies and find the trick/tips that will help you out if you do become disoriented. Remember the preplans in the wagon aren’t much help when you’re inside. In the above photograph, if you feel ladders or skids of drywall, what side/quadrant are you nearest when inside the College Park Home Depot, for example?

 


DSC_3122.jpg

 

Resolution No.5: Skip the Salty Look for the Experienced, Mature Look

Yeah, you’re Burkes are warped, but other than that, what did you learn? And, just as important, what did you teach to others? A lot of impressions are made on younger firefighters while at training evolutions. Just like your own children (if you have any) they are always watching you.

 

 

Resolution No. 6: Be Calm

Of course it’s a fire, why do you think they called you? We might wonder why heart attacks are one of the leading killers among us, and yet we still run at break neck speed out of the dayroom to the rig as soon as the printer and signboard speak up. “Engine __ to Communications, I have a column of smoke showing!!” Well, thanks for that, but is it really necessary? Will you forget to tell me your layout instructions because you’re so excited? Will I even understand your radio transmissions due to you yelling? It is a proven medical fact that the part of our brain that produces anxiety and the fight/flight sequences floods the frontal lobe, which is responsible for having us do things in an orderly, task oriented manner. Take a breath, take a second, and focus.

 

“The garbage man doesn’t get excited when he turns the corner and sees trash, and you shouldn’t get excited when you turn the corner and see fire.

You should expect fire on every run.” image100 - 10032053: brown duotone shot of refuse collector with trash, grinning excitedly

Andrew Fredericks

 


DOWNLOAD A COPY OF THIS POSTER BY CLICKING IT !
In Cooperation with the Canadian Fallen Firefighters Foundation, National Fallen Firefighters Foundation & FireFighterCloseCalls.Com

 


RESPONDING ACROSS RAILROAD GRADE CROSSINGS?
STOP....Always...NO EXCUSES....remember CATLETT, VA.



CLICK THIS LINK FOR THE REPORT:
 

 

EVER GET EJECTED? IT SUCKS! SEAT BELTS PREVENT EJECTIONS.....

CLICK THE ABOVE LOGO FOR ONE MORE REASON WHY SEATBELTS ARE NO LONGER AN OPTION!  (Civilian Ejected From Moving Car)

 

DO YOU REALLY KNOW THE ENEMY??

 
Thanks to AN Omaha, NE Firefighter, here is an excellent BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FOR FIREFIGHTERS PowerPoint program that can be used by any fire department....click below!


STILL can't convince your firefighters to wear seatbelts?

This may be the most dramatic clip we've posted yet. Take a look: (click here) 

...for additional, go to our SAFETY & SURVIVAL DOWNLOADS PAGE. (click here for that page)

 

 

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR EMERGENCY SCENES



Click here

FIREFIGHTERS....BUILDING CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION CLICK HERE FOR INFORMATION ON TRUSS CONSTRUCTION 

 

Daniel’s Block Fire-BACKDRAFT Video

(VIDEO BELOW)

394 Railroad Street

St. Johnsbury, Vermont

Submitted to FFCC By Fire Chief Troy Ruggles

 

 

Date:  January 28, 2000                        Temperature:  -30 F

Time of Alarm:  00:59               Number of Alarms:  7               3- civilian fatalities

 

Type of Occupancy:  Mixed Occupancy-Apartments over Mercantile

Building Construction Type:  Type 3 Ordinary- Balloon Frame

Building Size:  90 x 100  5 stories-  4 in front 5 in rear

Building protection:  No sprinkler or alarm system.  Local smokes in apartments only.

 

Exposures:  Side A- Street, Side B- 3 story wood frame, Side C-2 Story Wood Frame  Side C1- 6 Story Grain Mill Heavy Timber & Side D 5 Story Ordinary Construction Sprinkled.

 

00:59   Fire Alarm Office receives 911 call reporting a fire on #2 FLOOR IN Apt. 4

01:01   Engine 3 (2 personnel) Arrives on Scene Nothing visible from exterior- Reports to floor 2 and encounters a light to moderate smoke condition on floor 2.  They report to apartment 4 and begin search- Nothing found Eng-3 Personnel begin evacuating people. 

 

Occupancy at the time was 27 People in the building.

 

01:04 Car 1 on Scene establishes command- Observes two sides nothing showing- goes to front of stores nothing visible. 

 

01:05 radio contact with Eng- 3 that they are removing people

 

01:08 Engine 2 (3) Arrives on scene- Stretches 13/4” line to #2 floor as precaution-No fire encountered at this time.  Two members from engine 2 assist engine 1 with evacuation.

 

(Members had a very difficult time in getting people to leave the building.  Many of the people were staying in the building and had to be physically escorted out.  Condition at this time did not hamper their exit. Very time consuming.)

 

Approx.  01:12 Tower 4 (5) on scene members enter building to assist with search & rescue operation. 

 

 

Daniel’s Block Fire

394 Railroad Street

 

The following events took place with no exact time frame:

 

Shortly after companies were in the building removing occupants.  The plate glass storefront on the mercantile space dropped out lazily and smoke began to poor out of the store.  Command reported the conditions to the companies operating on the upper floors, 2, 3 & 4 that a fire condition was present on floor 1.  Eng-3 officer replied that the smoke and heat condition on the upper floors had deteriorated significantly and that the smoke was “Boiling” out of the floors and walls.  Eng-3 officer gained accountability of the 7 members on the upper floors and began exiting the building.  At the same time fire began blowing out the front of the store. Members using hooks removed all of the plate glass from the storefront.  Within seconds heavy fire was blowing out of the front of the store on #1 floor and extending up the front of the building over the roofline.  All firefighters were ordered out of the building.  Within 5 minutes of the firefighters exiting the upper floors the second floor collapsed.

A defensive operation was ordered and 2nd-3rd-& 4th alarms were transmitted.  Free burning fire continued as heavy master streams and big lines were put in to operation. 

At approximately 01:33  20 minutes after the fire broke out and free burning fire was involving the structure on floor #1 & 2 the Backdraft occurred. 

The backdraft was intense and forceful.  It is believed that accumulation of gases in the basement of the building were building up and eventually let go.  Precautionary measures of taking out the plate glass storefront were beneficial in reducing personal injury. 

 

When viewing the footage it appears that memebers were directly in front of the building, however members were at 45-degree angles to the front.  Operating lines.  All members operating were in full protective clothing and SCBA.  This helped reduce injuries as well.  Engine 1 personnel operating in the rear of the building trying to force a door were blown back across a parking lot when the backdraft occurred.  The top portion of the steel door folded from the force. 

This video was taken from a police cruiser parked approximately one block away.  You see signs of smoke churning at this angle.  From the front of the building the smoke did not appear that way. 

 

This backdraft occurred after ventilation had been completed and heavy fire burned for over 20 minutes involving the structure as well as contents. In addition, heavy streams operated on the fire well before the backdraft occurred.

We have experienced these types of building fires before.  The large open spaces and concealed spaces allowed these gases to build up to explosive concentrations.  Proper PPE certainly helped prevent injuries to our members.  It was clear to us that this fire had been concealed within the walls and floor of this building and burning for a period of time before it was reported.  The balloon frame constructions allowed for this fire to go unnoticed and gain headway.

 

CLICK THE BOX FOR THE VIDEO: 

A SIMPLE EXPLANATION FOR FIREFIGHTERS ON WHY FOOTING GROUND LADDERS IS IMPORTANT....

especially if YOU are climbing the ladder.
(click below)

 

A Virtual FireFighter Trainer

 While HANDS ON TRAINING IS ALWAYS the best....here is a GREAT source for inside training as well.  As you know, fire fighting and fire fighter training is dangerous. Methods are needed to allow fire fighters to gain experience before exposing themselves and others to danger. The objective of this work is to develop a computerized, science based fire fighting training tool to improve training opportunities.

Fire simulations are performed using the Fire Dynamics Simulator and Smokeview.. These tools have been used to perform various fire reconstructions such as the Cherry road townhouse fire, the Two story duplex Iowa fire, and the WTC fires. The next step is to adapt these tools, making them simpler to use and by allowing one to experience and interact with the computerized fire environment.

Go here for the entire program:

http://fire.nist.gov/fds/vfft/#flashover

 

TRENCH SAFETY AWARENESS PROGRAM
 http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs

/2006-133D/flash/index.html 
Check out the above trench awareness safety page. It’s geared towards general industry, but covers the majority items rescuers need to know.

 

VIDEO.....AIR BAG DANGER!
USE CAUTION WHEN OPERATING AT AUTO CRASHES!

 
This is a recently removed airbag from a car that was fired off with a traffic cone on top for firefighter safety demo purposes.  This was fired off by attaching it to a battery and then crossing two wires.  An action that could easily happen while extricating someone from a vehicle with extrication tools.....TRAIN TO SURVIVE! (CLICK BELOW)

 

OPERATING IN OR NEAR WATER???  ....AND IF YOU


ARE NOT TRAINED-STAY AWAY AND OUT!Operating on water to perform a RESCUE without training is THE SAME as a rookie going into a FIRE without training....or an EMT STUDENT running an ALS EMERGENCY. The RESULTS ARE PREDICTABLE...Instead of helping SOLVE a problem-you become PART OF THE PROBLEM.(CLICK the above LOGO for a SAMPLE WATER RESCUE SOP FOR FIREFIGHTERS AND EMS PERSONNEL)
 

 

POWERPOINT PROGRAM:RESULTS & RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK TO FIREFIGHTERS
(click the below logo)

 

FD & RAILROAD OPERATIONS SOP

This suggested SOP was developed for railroad responses by the Columbus, Ohio Fire Department. The CFD was involved in an incident several months ago and as a result they found out they needed to focus more on training for operations for responding to incidents where they are working on or near railroad tracks. Another good example set by the CFD!


(click the logo)

 

WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS....HONORING OUR FALLEN.

Click the below LOGO for the outstanding Honoring Our Fallen clip.  The important work that the Wildland Firefighter Foundation does is worthy of all our attention---check them out at:   www.wffoundation.org 

Also check out the Colorado Firecamp   www.coloradofirecamp.com 

 

 

CLICK BELOW FOR A

 "QUICK CARD" OF DRIVER SAFETY INFORMATION!

 

 

POWERPOINT DOWNLOAD: MOTEL ROOF COLLAPSE-FIREFIGHTERS TRAPPED Phoenix firefighters rushing to locate and rescue occupants on the second floor of a burning motel escaped serious injuries recently when a flaming roof partially collapsed and trapped them under burning debris.

 The pair, wearing SCBA and full PPE managed to free themselves and climb from the rubble just moments later.
They were taken to the hospital with minor injuries.  
(Click the logo for the PowerPoint)

 

 

Our thanks to the.....

Ontario (Canada) Office of the Fire Marshal and Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs for their....FREE DOWNLOADABLE
FIREFIGHTER SAFETY AND SURVIVAL POSTERS

 

FREE DOWNLOADABLE

NFFF FIREFIGHTER SURVIVAL TRAINING PROGRAM
 
 
As part of focused effort to help reduce firefighter line-of-duty deaths and injuries nationwide, the National Preparedness Network (PREPnet) will distribute via the Internet the Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives Resource Kit, a powerful media and training tool created by the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (NFFF) as part of its Everyone Goes Home program. First released in June 2006 to some 30,000 fire departments across the United States, the increased distribution represents the United States Fire Administration's continued commitment to its goal of reducing firefighter line-of-duty deaths by 50 percent by the year 2014. Through PREPnet, USFA will make the Resource Kit available to virtually every firefighter in the United States.

 
The Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives Resource Kit programs are
available on the Internet as follows:

Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives Part 1 - http://www.fc-tv.com/clients/prenet/firefighter1.asx

Chapter 1    Welcome and How To Use This Program 
Chapter 2    Line-of-Duty-Death Prevention       
Chapter 3    Are You On A Path to a Line of Duty Death?
                Personal & Organizational Assessment
Chapter 4    Keeping Fit For The Fight
        Health and Wellness

Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives Part 2 - http://www.fc-tv.com/clients/prenet/firefighter2.asx

Chapter 5    Arrive Alive!
        Safe Vehicle Operations and Scene Safety
Chapter 6    Staying Alive
        Fireground Safety
Chapter 7    Train the Way You Fight - But Safely
        Live-Fire Training
Chapter 8    Fighting the Fire Before The Fire
        Fire Prevention, Protection and the Built Environment

The kit is one of 16 important preparation programs that will save lives and property. All content is available free-of-charge. A complete list of these and other programs is available at
www.usfa.dhs.gov/training/prepnet/

 

Need info to teach NEW firefighters some basics of

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION?
 
Check this out!
 
FIRE SERVICE FEATURES OF BUILDINGS
 
(click below)

 

THE "MOVE OVER" VIDEO...YOUR VEST WON'T STOP THIS BULLET...........a roadway safety video courtesy of the IACP of interest to not only law enforcement...but fire, rescue and EMS personnel as well..

Your Vest Won’t Stop This Bullet, a 14-minute video produced by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, shows the deadly threat that police officers, emergency workers and highway construction crews face on a daily basis: Unpredictable drivers.The video is dedicated to the more than 700 law enforcement officers who have died during traffic incidents in the past ten years. The following video is very graphic, depicting peace officers injured in the line of duty, and is only intended for mature audiences.

This video has been formatted to be viewed by modem or high speed connection. If you cannot view the video there can be several problems: anti-virus software, firewalls, network settings, individual system settings, or spy ware software. If you receive a message that “Network is busy” try updating your Windows Media Player by going to “Help” then “Check for Player Updates.”View Video

mms://wmvstream.dese.mo.gov/stopthisbullet

 

 


ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF HOW AND WHY........WE GET HURT AND KILLED AT FIRE FIGHTER TRAINING FIRES.(Click DUH for the VIDEO)DOING A TRAINING FIRE? READ THIS FIRST!

 

2006 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptors & Their IMPACT on Firefighting &
Rescue Operations
 

These vehicles will be equipped with an automatic on-board fire suppression system for rear end collisions.  The operation of this system does have an impact on Fire / Rescue and EMS personnel. 

 Ford has web based training that describes the system and how to handle a vehicle involved in a crash: 
Click Here

 

LICK THE BELOW LOGO FOR THE "HEAVEN CAN WAIT"

SEAT BELT VIDEO

 

YA HAD A BAD DAY??? 

Civilians OR Fire/EMS Personnel....AVOIDING a "bad day" is a matter of EXPECTING the unexpected mixed with some training and leadership.The difference is CIVILIANS are expected to do some dumb stuff...and when they do, we try and fix it. When WE have a "bad day"...the outcome is often tragic and generally predictable...which is usually PREVENTABLE!
Click below for the "HAD A BAD DAY" video

 

HOSE TESTING...CLOSE CALL! CLICK BELOW for an EXCELLENT PowerPoint program from the Fresno, California FD on what happened-what they learned...

....and what we can learn from them! Our sincere thanks to the FFD.

AERIAL AND TOWER LADDER OPERATIONSUse EXTREME caution and EXPERTLY KNOW the Capabilities of your Aerial Device! 

Click the logo below for a video where an aerial device, being used to rescue civilians in an amusement park, tragically becomes part of the problem.

 

TORONTO FIREFIGHTERS TRAPPED (VIDEO)
(Courtesy of TorontoFirePics.com VIDEO COURTESY OF Jamie Larner, Mississauga, Ontario)

Click below for the video of the firefighters being forced to bail out of the dwelling fire. This video, and the previous photos drive home numerous reminders...one specifically being ladder placement to insure firefighters can get out quickly-and SAFELY.

 

FIREFIGHTER / EXPLOSION VIDEO CLIP:
Firefighter enters a boat-soaks it with gasoline-lights a fire.

Guess what happens next?
Click here:

 

 

 THE LAST THING CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES AND BUILDERS ARE FOCUSED ON IS....YOUR (FIREFIGHTER) SAFETY  ! ! 

Click the below logo for a powerpoint program regarding TRUSSES WITHOUT GUSSETS!

 

 

 

Building Construction & Firefighting...
PAY ATTENTION DAMMIT!!!

Firefighter Safety....
...and TRUSS SYSTEM FAILURES!
An excellent power point that may save your life courtesy of
the South Walton Fire District
(click below)

NYPD HIGHWAY COP STRUCK.....(Click the below NYPD logo)This could be-and has happened to FIREFIGHTERS as well.FULLY PROTECT YOUR SCENE-BY EXPECTING THE UNEXPECTED

Click the below link for suggested Fire/EMS Highway Protection SOP's:

 

 

SMOKE INHALATION, FIREFIGHTERS AND THE DEAD SERIOUS ISSUES OF CYANIDE (Below are articles, papers and related links)
 
Focus on Smoke Inhalation: The Most Common Cause of Acute Cyanide Poisoning
Marc Eckstein, MD, FACEP; Paul M. Maniscalco, MPA, DrBA(c), EMT-P
(Click the below logo for the article)

Danger - Cyanide 
The smoke at all of today's fires is not your Daddy's smoke. Please read March 06' Fire Engineering's article "The Breath From Hell" .. AND.....Read the JEMS supplement from 2004 SMOKE INHALATION & HYDROGEN CYANIDE POISONING The Danger Posed to Firefighters & Victims in Structure Fires by Las Vegas D/C Chief Ken Riddle:http://www.jems.com/data/pdf/smoke-poisoning.pdf    AND......Read this piece by Memphis D/C Gary Ludwig entitled: New Thinking Regarding Smoke Inhalation (Firehouse Magazine, June 2004). Here is a link  . AND, FINALLY also REMEMBER..........


 

DANGER ON THE ROADWAYS....

Expect the UNEXPECTED...AS THIS COULD EASILY HAVE BEEN A CHIEFS CAR, MEDIC UNIT OR FIRE APPARATUS! CLICK THE BELOW "CAUTION" TO SEE THIS DOWNLOAD!

 

WHAT'S ON YOUR HELMET?

Click on the helmet below for an interesting submitted powerpoint program on one specific hazard related to "traditional" style helmets...
....and a solution. 

LIVE FIRE TRAINING-EXPLOSION!

On April 27, 2002 the Cranesville Volunteer Fire Department was in the
process of conducting a live fire training exercise at 110 Poplar Drive in the
Town of Amsterdam, Montgomery County, New York, when a fire/explosion occurred
which resulted in the injury of 10 firefighters and one civilian. The training
exercise was being conducted as a controlled burn of a vacant residential
structure. The site was reported to have been previously utilized by the fire
department for other live fire training evolutions. The intent of the April
27th exercise was to complete the demolition of the two story woodframe
structure.
Click the below logo to view the video clip.

 

Search & Rescue Knots Index

 
The Figure Eight Figure 8 Loop Follow Through Loop Figure 8 Bend (Rope Join) Double Fishermans
The Prusik Knot Water Knot Girth Hitch The Double Overhand Stopper Knot
Figure 8 Double Loop Trucker's Hitch Tensionless Hitch The Bowline
  The Clove Hitch Webbing Harness  

 

 

Advice for PROBIES...

By the late, great Deputy Chief Ray Downey-FDNY

Rest In Peace, Chief

1. When ready for duty - check all the masks - full cylinders, clean facepieces, etc
2. When reporting for duty - ask if anyone wants to leave early
3. Make sure all your gear is ready to go. Check your pockets for gloves & light.
4. Make coffee-learn how the coffee machine works.
5. Lunch & Dinner - find out what has to be done, i.e., peel the potatoes, clean the fish, etc.,
6. Set the table, dishes, knives & forks, glasses, salt & pepper, etc.,
7. After lunch or dinner, jump into the sink, pots, pans, dishes, etc.,
8. When something has to be done, "Volunteer," don't wait for the Officer to tell you to do it
9. Find out what the "Company Policy Is!" watches, AFID, nozzle, back up, etc.,
10. Always say "SIR" to Chief's & Officers (they like it)
11. Always get off the rig with your mask when responding to a report of a "FIRE"
12. When at fire, listen for your Officers instructions
13. Always stay with your Company
14. At fires - STAY LOW
15. Keep your mouth shut and your eyes & ears open.
16. "NEVER GIVE UP," a famous quote from a D.I.

 

rescue2patch1.gif (25575 bytes)

 
Firefighters Trapped-and on fire-During Public Open House
 
The below link is to a video clip where firefighters were doing a demo for the public...and the unthinkable happened.
 
Thinking about conducting a TRAINING BURN?

Whenever possible, NIOSH recommends that training facilities with approved burn buildings be used for live-fire training. To minimize risks when participating in live-fire training, NIOSH recommends that fire departments comply with NFPA 1403 [NFPA 2002a], including the following precautions:

Instructors

  • Ensure that the instructor in charge is aware of his or her responsibility for overall coordination of the training and compliance with NFPA 1403.
    Ensure that instructors are qualified to provide live-fire training. Verify instructor [NFPA 2002b] and officer qualifications [NFPA 2003a] through national certifying agencies such as the National Professional Qualifications Board, the International Fire Service Accreditation Congress, or through a State fire board or commission.

Site Set Up

  • Ensure that the acquired structure is adequate and safe to be used for live-fire training. Use Appendix B of NFPA 1403 as a checklist for pre-burn planning, building preparation, and pre-burn/post-burn procedures.
    Develop, implement, and train fire fighters in standard operating procedures (SOPs) for live-fire training.
    Conduct a pre-burn briefing session for all participants, and establish an evacuation plan and signal.
    Ensure that a sufficient water supply is available.
    Ensure that the fuels used in the live-fire training have known burning characteristics.
    Inspect the structure for possible environmental hazards.
    Do not use flammable or combustible liquids in live-fire training.
    Do not set fires for live-fire training in any designated exit paths.
    Do not allow anyone to play the role of victim inside the structure during live-fire training.
    Establish a method of fire ground communication among the IC and fire fighters.
    Ensure that proper ventilation is in place before the onset of a controlled burn and is coordinated with interior operations.
    Ensure that backup personnel are standing by with equipment, ready to provide assistance or rescue.
    Ensure that all fire fighters participating in live-fire training have had minimum basic training.
    Ensure that each fire fighter is equipped with NFPA-compliant full protective clothing, a NIOSH approved self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), and a personal alert safety system (PASS).
    Establish rehabilitation operations at training exercises that pose the risk of fire fighters exceeding a safe level of physical or mental endurance [NFPA 2003b].

Site Safety

  • Appoint a separate, adequately trained safety officer that has the authority to intervene in any aspect of the live-fire training.
    Ensure that all participants are accounted for when entering and exiting the building.
    Assign only one person as the ignition officer. Ensure that he or she is not a fire fighter participating in the training.
    Ensure that the ignition officer lights only one training fire at a time.
    Ensure that a charged hose line is present while igniting the fire.
    Use a thermal imaging camera during live-fire training situations to observe fire fighters and monitor heat conditions for safety.

Training Participants

  • Follow Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) established by the department.
    Use NFPA-compliant full protective clothing, an SCBA, and a PASS device, as provided by the department.
    Do not enter a hazardous environment alone. Enter only as a team of two or more.
    Be familiar with the fire department?s evacuation plan and signal.
 
A CLOSE CALL DURING AN EQUIPMENT
DEMO FROM A VENDOR....
This report, courtesy of Fairfax County (VA.) Fire & Rescue, outlines a CLOSE CALL where a firefighter, using a "Firefighter Escape Device" during an equipment demonstration descended in a rapid, uncontrolled fashion and suffered a back injury.
The report identifies, among several factors, proper training, vendor issues and clear understanding/direction of how to use a "new" or "demo" device as one of several factors in this CLOSE CALL.
Thanks to the IAFC Safety, Health and Survival Section for the info.
 
FFCC.Com NOTES: How many time have ANY of us "tried something out" from a well meaning fire equipment dealer or rep? Normal operating safety practices and the following of related SOP's can result in a good day ....as opposed to a CLOSE CALL.
 
LOOKING FOR AN EXCELLENT FIRE PRE-PLAN WORKSHEET?
 
To: FirefighterCloseCalls.com,
I have created a Fire Pre-Plan Worksheet that we have adopted in our department. I have passed it along to other local departments as well. I would like to make it available to all departments that visit www.FirefighterCloseCalls.com  so other departments can use it to their advantage. Any FD can feel free to make any modifications they need to accommodate their department needs-and they can have this with our compliments..
                                                                       Fraternally Yours,
                                                                  Deputy Chief Millay
                                                                  Llanerch Fire Company
                                                                  Haverford Township Bureau of Fire (Pa) 
 

50 Ways to Save your Brother (or Sister)
In 2005, there was
106
line-of-duty firefighter deaths ?  

What can you do to stop the trend ???

  1. KNOW YOUR JOB !!
  2. Drive responsibly     
  3. Risk nothing to save nothing
  4. Know your apparatus
  5. Act safely
  6. Eat right
  7. Wear your PPE
  8. Stop at red lights / stop signs
  9. Look like a professional
  10. Know your nozzles
  11. Train like your life depends on it
  12. Wear your seat belt
  13. Don?t freelance
  14. Be aware of your surroundings
  15. Study tactics
  16. Use ventilation wisely
  17. Don?t breath smoke
  18. Risk little to save little (property)
  19. Watch out for your partner
  20. Be aware of your air
  21. Take your tools
  22. Know how to read couplings
  23. Perform a size-up on every call
  24. Weigh risk versus benefit
  25. Understand fire behavior
  26. Know our SOG?s   
  27. Practice safe EMS
  28. Know your tools
  29. Be professional
  30. Prepare mentally
  31. Stay fit
  32. Understand strategies
  33. Don?t speed
  34. Maintain accountability
  35. Protect the roadway
  36. Don?t take unnecessary risks
  37. Know your knots
  38. Make sure GPM?s outdo BTU?s
  39. Train like you mean it
  40. Know two ways out
  41. Take care of your body
  42. Recognize flashover - backdraft
  43. Drive to survive
  44. Train often
  45. Be nice
  46. Pay attention to details
  47. Think SAFETY
  48. Be decisive
  49. Risk a lot to save a lot (life)
  50. Follow local / state / federal laws
 
ONE FD's SOLUTION TO HELPING EDUCATE THE PUBLIC ON PAYING ATTENTION TO...
RESPONDING EMERGENCY VEHICLES! 
Click here for the LAFD "Make The Right Move" Program:
 
 
 
ROOF AND RELATED CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION INCLUDING TRUSS TERMS/DEFINITIONS/GLOSSARY 
 
Check out:
 

 

Who Wants to be Alive.... Tomorrow?

 

(Patterned after ?Who Wants to be a Millionaire??)

 

(While not a download now-WE downloaded this when it was sent to us...so it counts!)

By Dan Smits? Calumet City (IL.) FD

 

 

 

Objectives:

 

 

 

 

To know the use, safety concerns, and location of department equipment.

 

 

 

 

To identify those areas needing additional firefighting training by company officers

 

 

 

 

To promote self-satisfaction and encouragement to others from individual member?s knowledge

 

 

                

 

 

To promote teamwork of the crew in attaining a goal

 

 

 

 

TO KEEP FIREFIGHTERS ALIVE

 

 

 

Preparation

: Create approximately 40 index cards or slips of paper that have various items to locate on your apparatus. If appropriate, a quick demonstration of the equipment?s use, purpose and or safety tips will be explained during this instruction. Place them in a container so they can be pulled by seniority, starting with the youngest firefighters.     

 

 

 

 

Examples include: Water extinguisher, plastic shovels, chain saw, Helicopter GPS locations information sheet, Oil-Dri, 100 foot of rescue rope, 1 hour bottles, extra foam, deck gun on ground mount (this requires moving it from the engine to the ground mount)  

 

 

 

Method to use

:

 

 

 

 

Inform students that this is designed to assist them in testing their knowledge of equipment locations and use. Everyone will probably have an item that is difficult to find. Understanding the item, and its location whether or not you have picked it, is important to the team.   

 

 

 

 

The company officers should assist in providing safety tips, tactical tips, and/or things that may assist in the item?s use.

 

 

 

Some Rules

:

 

 

 

 

If you do not know where to find the item or how to perform the basic functions of your chosen item you can:

 

 

 

  • Call a friend

     

  • Ask the rest of your company (The audience)

     

  • Ask to be given a hint (Reducing the choices)

     

 

 

 

If you choose a lifeline you must choose an additional item from the container before we move to the next person. (No assistance from others unless the penalty will occur.) Continue to go through the choices until all of them are used.

 

 

 

Variations

:

 

 

 

 

Allow only one compartment to be opened to find an item.

 

 

Require the use of the item to be found in your policies or training manuals.

 

 

Require a safety tip for every item.

 

 

.                  

 

 

 

 

10 SIMPLE RULES FOR FIREFIGHTING

...a free PowerPoint program courtesy of the
..... YORK COUNTY (PA.) FIRE SCHOOL

(click here)

Just another REMINDER of ...the HAZARDS OF US WORKING ON ROADWAYS! 

(Click the CAUTION sign!)

 

---FORCIBLE ENTRY PPT SLIDE PROGRAM---

Commercial Buildings With MAVERICK BARS.....?
The bars are used as SUUPLEMENTAL security...but create ANOTHER problem for FIREFIGHTERS.
BE PREPARED...check this out!
(click here)

ADDITIONALLY: Here is a PDF of a suggested SOP related to this issue:
http://www.co.pg.md.us/Government/PublicSafety/Fire-EMS/PDFs/smart_drills/3-028_Maverick_Bars_Pt1.pdf

SAFETY OFFICER CHECKLISTS AND RELATED DOWNLOADS: 

CLICK HERE for some excellent downloads courtesy of Al Mozingo featuring various checklists and related items for Fire Department Safety Officers.

 

GSA Presents Firefighter Forcible Entry Training

Many new and recently renovated government facilities have windows that are specially designed to protect occupants from glass fragments and debris that may result from explosions, high winds, gun shots, physical attack, and other severe events. These special windows are generally harder to break than typical windows. This may cause some difficulties for an unsuspecting and unprepared occupant or firefighter attempting to vent or clear a window in the case of an emergency. In response, the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Public Building Service (PBS) sponsored the development of training to make occupants and
emergency responders aware of the special characteristics of security windows and to provide training in proper methods to ingress or egress through such systems.
The training presents background information on blast, hurricane, and ballistic resistant windows, along with methods and issues associated with clearing such windows. The web-based training is available to the public at http://www.oca.gsa.gov/ firefighter/index.php . The website includes videos of firefighters using hand tools and power tools to vent and clear a wide variety of windows. In addition the full report and a training manual are downloadable from the website.
Students may evaluate their knowledge by taking the examination and are eligible for a certificate of training should they pass the test.
Since the training website was made available in July 2005, several hundred firefighters and other interested parties have taken the course and successfully passed the online examination. The need for such information was first identified by Mr. Willie Hirano of GSA?s Region 10 in Auburn WA . Mr. Steven C. Smith GSA?s Subject Matter Expert for Security located in Washington DC facilitated the development of the on-line training and its distribution to the general public.
For further information contact: Mr. Steven Smith at stevenc.smith@gsa.gov or Mr. Willie Hirano at willie.hirano@gsa.gov.


Image from training course.

 

WARNING!

Multiple Fire Stations Responding To The Same Call...??

USE CAUTION------INTERSECTION LEAP FROG!

(Click Here For an EXCELLENT Power Point Program on MULTI-UNIT RESPONSE Courtesy Of the Florida State Fire College)

Here is a......
PPT. Program Created By A Michigan Firefighter Using Some Of The Photos From The FirefighterCloseCalls.com Gallery Section...
This program features numerous photos from the gallery for use by Fire Instructors and Officers.

(click here)

FIREFIGHTERS AND CANCER....An Important Message From A Brother Firefighter.......
(Click the below picture)

http://www.ergometricsonline.com/markNoble/play.cfm

 

Get out alive in 30 seconds!

?Personal Escape Systems?


CLICK HERE FOR THE ARTICLE

by
Dale G. Pekel
Lieutenant City of Wauwatosa Fire Dept.
FFDPEK@aol.com
Captain Elm Grove Fire Dept.

THE ERROR CHAIN!

This paper has to do with the error chain that is
developed before every accident/incident....and is well worth reading by those who like doing the research to determine "the how and why" of near miss or direct hit events! By Patrick Love
Company Officer- Poudre Fire Authority-Fort Collins, CO.

(Click Here)

VIDEO FROM POLICE CAM-DRIVER STRIKES STATE TROOPER IN TENNESSEE...

ONE MORE REASON WHY WE MUST BE PROTECTED ON THE ROADWAYS

The below video download is yet another amazing example of how dangerous the roadways are for emergency services personnel.

*****DIVERT-BLOCK-PROTECT!*****
EXPECT CIVILIANS TO BE HIGH, DRUNK OR STUPID!!

(click HERE for the video)

Here is info from the news story:

LENOIR CITY, Tenn. (6-15-05)-- Three Chester County concert-goers remain in jail after allegedly hitting a highway patrol trooper while they were high on drugs, officials said.
The accident occurred on the northbound lane of Interstate 75 about 4:30 p.m. Sunday, about 35 miles south of Knoxville, Tenn., according to Melissa McDonald, public information officer with the Tennessee Department of Safety.

All three were being held in the Loudon County Jail in Lenoir City, Tenn. As of Tuesday morning, a bail hearing had not been held, said McDonald.

The group was on its way home from the Bonnaroo music festival, held in Manchester, Tenn. They were about 110 miles from the concert site when their vehicle, a Toyota Rav4, came upon the area where Tennessee Highway Patrol Trooper Rodney Redmon was investigating a two-vehicle accident, said McDonald.

The trooper heard screeching tires as he carried documents back to the drivers involved in the crash he was investigating, police said.

According to McDonald, the Rav4 slid sideways and hit the left rear quadrant of the trooper?s squad car before hitting Redmon as he stood on the shoulder. McDonald did not know how fast the vehicle was traveling. It was raining at the time of the accident. Redmon was knocked 10 feet into the air and landed in the right-hand lane of traffic, authorities said.

"Luckily, he was able to get out of the road before he was struck by anyone else," said McDonald. He was taken by ambulance to the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville, where he was released later that night.

The Rav4 came to a stop on the shoulder and a search of the vehicle found 23 doses of LSD, hallucinogenic mushrooms, a pipe and rolling papers, police said. Blood tests were taken of the driver, McDonald said. Results were not yet available. Redmon, 52, of Rockwood, Tenn., is a veteran with the force.

www.FirefighterCLoseCalls.com

WARNING:
Re: THE USE OF BUG REPELLENT / DEET ON / IN NOMEX FIREFIGHTER CLOTHING / PPE

(download notification)

 

WILDLAND FIRE CLOSE CALL! The Slaughter Gulch Fire

Below is a link to a power point program relating to the Slaughter Gulch burnover. As
a picture paints a thousand words this tells a story worth noting....

(click here)

STILL NOT CONVINCED OF HOW BAD IT CAN BE?

Take a look at THIS video clip...now, picture it being a piece of fire apparatus, responding with your firefighters, not wearing seat belts and assorted tools un-secure in the cab....
Truck = 65,000 lbs.
Speed = 50 mph
Kinetic Energy = 5.5 MILLION ft. lbs.
Stopped in 24 INCHES


(click here)

Car Fires and Wearing ALL of Your PPE!

Why "head to toe" is critical...including your gear, your hood and your SCBA.

It's time the whiners stop whining and JUST DO IT!
Wear ALL Of Your PPE When There Is ANY Potential Of Getting Hurt Or Killed. We all know it's too hot out, it's too uncomfortable or any of the other excuses heard over and over.
But those are LAME excuses.

Still not sure: Check Out This Video....and imagine taking a DEEP breath of this stuff without an SCBA......like this firefighter does.
(click here)

Seatbelt Drill 

From The East Franklin Fire Company, N.J.

 

 

 

Objective:

 

To decrease the amount of time required to don PPE, SCBA, and seatbelt in order to increase safety and readiness.

 

 

Evolution Description:

 

The stopwatch shall begin when the instructor says ?Go?, and will end when all of the members have dismounted the apparatus with tools.

 

????????? PPE Requirements

 

 

?         Shall be left by apparatus not on gear racks

 

?         Bunker Pants

 

?         Hood- Can hang back over coat

 

?         Jacket- Buttons and clips must be secure

 

 

SCBA

 

 

?         All shoulder and waist straps shall be secure

 

 

Seatbelts

 

 

?         Shall be worn prior to the driver releasing the air brake

 

?         Shall remain on until the driver engages the air brakes

 

 

 

Total Crew:

 

Driver- Wearing just bunker pants

 

Officer- Take Camera

 

2 Pack Men- Irons & Can

 

 

Apparatus:

 

Squad 27

 

 

Evolution Example:

 

 

1.      Instructor gives the ?Go?

 

2.      Members don PPE

 

3.      Members board apparatus

 

4.      Members don seatbelt

 

5.      Driver disengages airbrake

 

6.      Members don SCBA

 

7.      Driver engages air brake (Drivers does not have to wait till SCBA?s are donned)

 

8.      Members doff seatbelt

 

9.      Members take assigned tools and dismount apparatus

 

10.  Time ends when the last members dismounts the apparatus

 

 

 

Notes:

 

Consider an initial evolution where SCBA straps and seatbelts are not left in a ready state and compare your times at the end. Stress the fact that when SCBA straps and seatbelts are left in a ready state it can drastically decrease your readiness time.

 

 

 

Group 1

 

 

Initial Trial

 

 

Trial 2

 

 

Trial 3

 

 

Driver:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Officer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pack 1:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pack 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 2

 

 

Initial Trial

 

 

Trial 2

 

 

Trial 3

 

 

Driver:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Officer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pack 1:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pack 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(DOWNLOAD HERE)

A belgium CLOSE CALL CAUGHT ON FILM ! (w/ppt slides)

These photo slides happened in Europe. I know your Dutch ain't the way it used to be but I will help you out.
There was a fire in a multi story building. There was a crew working on the fourth floor doing overhaul. During the overhaul period the floor beneath the platform flashed and became fully involved. The crew working on the 4 floor noticed what happened on the floor below them and make their way back to the bucket. ( The bucket was the only way out of this floor.)
If you take a good look at the sequence of the pictures you can see the smoke build up underneath the bucket. The MPO of the aerial realized this and wanted to make sure that he had everybody inside the bucket before turning it away form the building.
At the moment the last firefighter was safely in the bucked the third floor flashed. The bucked and the firefighters were fully engulfed by flames.
This whole sequence took 33 seconds!!
Fortunately thanks to wearing full PPE and lot of luck nobody got hurt. The bucket and the control panel completely burned out.
They had a guardian angel looking over them

(CLICK HERE)

BOAT EXPLOSION........

USE CAUTION WHEN TRAINING! Does this make it clear ??

Click Here

 

OUTSTANDING WILDLAND SAFETY PPT PROGRAM!

Even though these are Western wildfire scenes, the overall message is applicable to all of our jobs as firefighters. This was sent out to everyone in my department by our division chief, and I thought it would be good for everyone to check out. I hope you guys like these photos in the presentation.
From a Western Firefighter.

(click here)

APPARATUS RESPONSE SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS!!

This is a video from the inside of the cab of an engine company responding "2nd due" to a car fire w/wet roads....with another engine company already operating on the scene.....
An excellent clip for training purposes.........
"Risk vs. Benefit" ?? Click Here

MORE PROOF ....of why WE Should Always Be Belted In!

2 Video Downloads:

The Volvo one clearly depicts the damage an unbelted occupant can do to others in the cab of a truck. Imagine that person wearing SCBA and the damage that could do! Click here

The other is from Drive Cam and shows the force that is exerted on a person who is not belted and just what they can do. Note the damage done to the rear view mirror by the head of the driver. Click here

For the Safety and Survival Downloads Page:

STAND DOWN FOR FIREFIGHTER SAFETY POWERPOINT PROGRAM DOWNLOAD

We have created this power-point to give to our fire department on Monday night. If you want and think that it will be a valuable tool for other FD's to use, feel free to post it and use it. We took all the information from your web site (which if fantastic) to put this all together. The videos will need to be down loaded into the program because you cannot email them. The instructions are in the notes section of the power-point for people to find them and down load.

Courtesy Of: Michael Keefe, Captain / Training Officer, Wright / Tallmadge Fire Department, Michigan

HIGHWAY INCIDENT MANAGEMENT DOWNLOAD

The "Hampton Roads Highway Incident Management" video and the "Hats of Incident Management" video that were previously posted by Virginia DOT have been re-located to a new server to hopefully handle the web traffic load better. You may recall that the shortly after the videos were put on-line a couple of months ago, the huge demand crashed the VDOT server. The new locations should be better able to handle the traffic (fingers crossed).

Please update any web page references and links for the two videos and provide the new file location which is: <http://cts.virginia.edu/incident_mgnt_training.htm>

The videos can be downloaded for free.
(Courtesy of ResponderSafety.com)

FIREFIGHTER AUTO EXTRICATION SAFETY INFO

Our pal Ron Moore has done a special satellite TV broadcast with State Farm Auto Insurance company.  It is a 90-minute video-based program designed as
an update for US and Canadian emergency responders on four topics; vehicle
airbag systems, electrical systems, handling gasoline/electric hybrid
vehicle emergencies, and new vehicle design and construction materials. 

The entire program is available for streaming video viewing on their website at http://www.autodesignextrication.com/ .
Each of the four segments will be separate modules for viewing.  Because the
program is no longer 'live', Ron's email address is listed for those who view
the material and have follow-up questions.

Want to see a hybrid vehicle that has actually been involved in a collision?
Interested in how it did or didn't hold up? Sitting right next to that is a
Honda Insight that has been systematically cut away to show all the hybrid
vehicle components. Great opportunity to see what really makes up a hybrid
vehicle.

Have you ever seen one of the new SMART passenger front seats that knows how
you are sitting in the seat? If you fall asleep as a passenger, it shuts off
the side impact airbag automatically. The State Farm broadcast will show how
this amazing new technology works and much more.

What vehicle is out there with two separate 12-volt batteries; one under the
hood and the other in the trunk?  The battery under the hood just fires up
the starter.  It's the separate battery in the trunk that actually runs
everything else.  The challenge of this is there's no connecting wires
between the two.  You shut down the front battery and one might think
they've shut down the entire electrical system.  Wrong!  Tune in to hear
about this challenge and more tips on dealing with the new model electrical
systems.  By the way, it's a brand new Mercedes SL-class car with the
separate, dual battery system.

Confused about boron, that exotic metal you hear so much about? Have you
ever seen the B-pillar of a Subaru Forester; the one that actually has a
piece of steel rebar welded inside it? Well I show that B-pillar and
actually take it apart piece by piece. You won't believe it!

Our thanks to Ron Moore, Batt Chief/Training Officer
McKinney TX Fire Department
Rmoore@firehouse.com

 

FIRST DUE!...The Art of READING SMOKE!

This download and very basic "crib notes" are courtesy of our pal, well known fire instructor, safety advocate and long time Secret List member, Chief Dave Dodson...... Some may feel that this is an oversimplification of it - but our take is that the brief info is conservative and leans towards overly cautious which, in our opinions, need to happen right now!

The "CRIB NOTES" BELOW are a great "intro" to get firefighters to start to understand the tactical issues of READING SMOKE.

 

********CLICK HERE for a "Reading Smoke" PowerPoint Program*********

 

As a First-Due OFFICER, you MUST be able to predict fire behavior and hostile fire events. If you don?t, firefighters will die or be critically injured. The key to predicting fire behavior is in your ability to READ SMOKE as you arrive and begin firefighting operations. REMEMBER: Fires today are hotter, faster, and more explosive than even five years ago.

 

First, you must know the Advanced basics:

? Concept #1: Smoke is FUEL

? Concept #2: The fuels have CHANGED!

? Concept #3: The fuels have trigger points that cause hostile fire events

 

Hostile fire event warning signs:

? Flashover = Turbulent smoke, rollover, auto-ignition

? Backdraft = yellowish smoke, bowing windows, totally pressurized compartments

? Smoke Explosion = trapped gases in upper areas that are air-mixed w/increasing heat

? Rapid Fire Spread = gases at their fire-point, dense, rapid smoke flow in hallways, and stairways

 

Ground Rules for Reading Smoke:

? Best Picture is outside, the more sides the better

? Compare smoke from various cracks, seams, and ventilation openings

 

STEP 1: Look at the smoke and see what the KEY FACTORS are saying:

? Volume: Amount of fuel off-gassing, fullness of box, sets an impression

? Velocity: How fast is it leaving: is it volume or heat pushed? Helps find the location of fire

? Density: Quality of Burning, potential for event, significance of event

? Color/Variations: Stage of heating, location of burning, amount of flaming, filtration of smoke, ?distance or resistance,? brown=structural component heating, black=precursor to an event.


STEP 2: Decide if anything is changing the KEY FACTORS:
Container - Thermal Balance - Firefighting Efforts ? Weather ? Sprinkler Systems

 

STEP 3: Determine the rate of change

? Getting Worse? How FAST is it getting worse?

 

STEP 4: PREDICT THE NEXT FIRE EVENT !!!

 

Short Cuts:

1. Smoke/Air split in opening = fire on same level

2. Smoke doesn?t lift in large opening = fire below

3. Smoke at doorway is static or disappears = fire above

4. Turbulent smoke = flashover or ignition imminent

5. Brown Smoke = unfinished wood - Structural elements mid-stage heating?

6. ?Black Fire? = too rich to burn but acting just like flames ? EXPLOSIVE!

7. Smoke leaving multiple openings is same color and velocity = deep seated fire

8. White smoke with velocity = distance ? but a hot fire

9. Very thin, active (fast), black smoke = flame driven, fire is nearby

 

Questions? Call or Email Dave Dodson, DaveDFYFD@aol.com

(303)912-1201

(All of the above info is copyrighted to Dave Dodson and may be used by firefighters in training but may not be used or reproduced for profit)

The 2003 US Firefighter Disorientation Study

No more 'MAYDAYS'

Provided By Capt. William Mora San Antonio Fire Department

On Feb. 27, 1997, at a third-alarm fire involving a thrift store, one of our firefighters was seriously injured after becoming disoriented when he became separated from his handline. Several other firefighters also became disoriented after encountering a pile of tangled handlines in the structure.

Two years later we thought we had a solution. I had returned from the Fire Department Instructors Conference with a Bernard Easy Exit Arrow, which is a directional arrow applied to firefighting hose. The arrow helps a firefighter safely exit a smoke-filled environment. Having taught classes in self-contained breathing apparatus and the search and rescue procedure, I knew the arrows would help us.

However, as I reviewed the safety report on the thrift store fire, I realized that the arrows would not have helped the injured firefighter because the nozzle he was using had been inadvertently jerked out of his hands during the fire. After losing the nozzle, he dropped to the floor and crawled around in circles unsuccessfully trying to locate the handline. At this time he was separated from his crew, and the evacuation tone was sounding. With conditions deteriorating he actually crawled deeper into the building thinking he was heading toward the exit but miraculously found and fell out of a window that had moments earlier been forced opened by a truck company.

This led me to try to determine what caused the disorientation and what could be done to prevent it. A three-year firefighter disorientation study was conducted. The study focused on 17 incidents in which disorientation played a part in 23 firefighter fatalities, as well as several injuries and narrow escapes occurring over a 22-year time span.

 

(CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE ENTIRE STUDY)

Deputy Survives Being Hit by Pickup

 

 


Everyday, tens of thousands of us travel Minnesota highways and interstates and it?s not uncommon to see state troopers or county deputies pulled over on the side of the road.

 

Yet, there are still too many drivers who disobey the law and don?t move over a lane or slow down when passing these vehicles.

Wednesday, a dashboard mounted camera in a Minnesota state patrol car caught a horrific accident on tape. The result could have been much worse.

The videotape, released by the state patrol, shows a truck plowing into a Ramsey County deputy helping someone on the side of the road Wednesday morning.

The most amazing thing, the deputy received only minor injuries.

Ramsey County Deputy Glenn Pothen had stopped to assist a state trooper who was helping a woman whose car had gone into the ditch, when a Toyota pickup slammed into him on the side of the road.

The accident happened near Interstate 694 and 35-E.

Pothen is a 35-year-old, father of two who has been with the Ramsey County Sheriff?s office for seven years. He was taken to a hospital, treated for injuries and released.

State patrol officials say they are releasing the tape out frustration and in hopes of getting the driving public to realize how crucial it is for them to move over and slow down.

"When I saw the tape this morning, I already knew that the deputy had survived and in fact wasn't seriously injured, and my thought was, 'I'm watching a fatality crash,"' said state patrol Capt. Jay Swanson. "My thought was, 'In a couple days I'm going to be going to another funeral.'

State patrol officials say the incident is still under investigation, but it doesn?t appear drugs, alcohol or high speeds were involved.

http://www.kare11.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=97284

Firefighter Heat Stress & Rehabilitation

 

Submitted by Peter McBride

 

(CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD FIREFIGHTER REHAB POWERPOINT)

 

(CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD FIRE ENGINEERING ARTICLE)

 

What do athletes, bakers and firefighters have in common? The answer is that they have all suffered from heat stress due to the nature of their work. So why is this important to us in the fire service? It is because there is relatively new science out there that can help cool firefighters? core temperature and diminish the likelihood of being injured from heat stress.

 

We all know that firefighting is hot strenuous work. That our core temperatures can become elevated allowing us to get overheated while working in hot and humid environments. Our metabolic heat is largely trapped by our PPE and provides little opportunity to cool ourselves through sweating. Although cooling is restricted, our body?s cardiovascular system will vasodilate to promote sweating. At the same time the sweat removes water from our system resulting in a decrease of the heart?s stroke volume and increase of our heart rates.[1] We will also lose a certain amount of plasma and this can have the effect of ?thickening? our blood. Could this make us even more prone to heart attacks in the line of duty? So you can see that paying attention to heat stress and rehabilitation are essential firefighter safety concerns?

 

For too long, too many of us have considered rehabilitation to consist primarily of ?dressing down? to cool off, rest and re-hydration. A recent study out of Canada has however, shed some science on the importance of core cooling. According to a study conducted by Dr. Tom Mclellan from Defense Research and Development Canada[2], a firefighter can increase his safe work time by 20% by replacing 2/3 of fluids lost, compared to someone who did not re-hydrate. With full re-hydration and ?active cooling? of their core temperature, a firefighter can work safely (before their core temperature becomes too hot) up to 100% longer than without hydration and active cooling. These are the kinds of arguments we need to present to resource-conscious, and possibly even change-resistant fire chiefs and district administrators to show them the value of utilizing proper rehabilitation where required. It?s a win-win situation. This study also demonstrates that forearm immersion is the most effective means of ?active cooling?

 

The May 2004 edition of Fire Engineering featured an excellent article on rehabilitation that references these studies and provides a good generic SOP that captures much of the material listed in NFPA?s rehab guideline. It suggests that rehab should consist of rest, re-hydration, active cooling, medical monitoring, protection from the elements and food where required. For those of you who are interested we have a slide show (as shown above) provided by the Peter McBride, one authors of this article that you are free to use to help cover rehab in your departments.

 

Stay cool. Stay safe.

 

2004 Firefighter Fatality Report from the NFPA

Below is a link to the 2004 firefighter fatality report and a special report on sudden cardiac deaths. Both reports are being put up on the NFPA web site today and will be available to all visitors to view and download. The firefighter fatality report will be in the July/August issue of NFPA Journal. The NFPA issued a press release on 5/16/05 that talked about the special report and the 2004 firefighter fatality numbers.

http://www.nfpa.org/newsReleaseDetails.asp?categoryid=488&itemId=24396

Provided to FFCC by Russ Sanders of the NFPA Central Regional Office in Louisville, Ky.

DOWNLOAD: 50 WAYS FIREFIGHTERS DIE

An excellent piece by Deputy Chief Vincent Dunn, FDNY Ret.

Click here: http://vincentdunn.com/dunn/50.pdf

2 NEW NIOSH FIRE REPORTS (May 26, 2005)

"Career Fire Fighter Dies After Falling From Tailboard and Being Backed
Over by Engine - California (F2005-01)" that can be found at the
following link:

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/face200501.html

"Career Fire Fighter Dies From Injuries Sustained In Fall From Apparatus
- Massachusetts (F2004-19)" that can be found at the following
link:

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/face200419.html

Roadway Incident Scene Safety Checklist - Click Here

Thanks to Emergency Responder Safety Institute Director of Training Jack Sullivan for the above. For more Information see respondersafety.com

Do We Have "PERMISSION" to use the term MAYDAY?

Click here for a piece by Burt Clark on the issue of MAYDAYS.

FIREFIGHTERS AND SEATBELTS: WHAT IS the solution?

Click here for a piece by Burt Clark on the issue of US wearing our BELTS.

The ISO Needed Fire Flow Guide Download

Needed fire flow is the amount of water that should be available for providing fire protection at selected locations throughout a community. ISO has prepared a guide for estimating needed fire flow. The publication is only a guide and requires knowledge and experience in fire-protection engineering for its effective application.
You can download a copy of the Guide for Determination of Needed Fire Flow. The document is a PDF file of approximately 90kB. You can view or print the file with a free Adobe? Acrobat? Reader...or go to:

http://www.isomitigation.com/downloads/ppc3001.pdf

Customized reports available at NO CHARGE.
For information about your own community's public fire protection, a customized PPCTM report is available by mail from ISO. The report includes a list of the Needed Fire Flows for all the commercial occupancies ISO has on file for your community, as well as details of the latest review of your community's fire protection services (that is, your PPC grading). The report is available only to your community's fire chief or chief administrative official. ISO does not charge communities for these reports.

For more information . . .
. . . on any topic related to the PPCTM program or the Fire Suppression Rating Schedule, click Talk to ISO Mitigation or call the ISO mitigation specialists at 1-800-444-4554.

(Thanks to Insurance Services Office for the above info)

Highway Incident Safety for Emergency Responders?

Author: Jack Sullivan, CSP, CFPS

Click Here: http://www.lionvillefire.org/hwy_safety/index.htm

(FFCC.com Notes: As far as we are concerned, the above link and information is amongst the BEST available in the protection of firefighters on the roadways!)

PROTECT & BLOCK THE SCENE...which can also mean protecting the scene...from one of our own!

This INCREDIBLE but true video clip shows the arrival of what could be a chiefs car...as it runs over the supply line and drives right between the firefighters fighting the fire-and the fire.

(Click here)

Thanks to www.chicagoFIREvideo.com for this clip.

Power Point:
COOS BAY, OREGON FIREFIGHTER FATALITIES

This download is provided in an effort to prevent future firefighter injury and death and to honor the Firefighters who lost their lives that day.

(Download Here)

HIDDEN HAZARDS!


Let me open by saying how much I enjoy your web page. I visit it at least once a day and have used some of the information found in my own teaching. I also encourage every one of my students, friends, and co-workers to sign up for the secret list. Over the last couple of months I have come to realize the asset of the Internet and the true value of sharing information, with this being said I felt I should share some information. I am an engineer/paramedic. I always have a digital camera in my vehicle and when I see a potential hazard or training topic, I just simply snap a picture and save it for later use. I have attached a Power Point with pictures from 2 different structures I have seen having a new roof system being put over a previous roof without the removal of the previous roof structure. I put some comments on the slides for point to ponder. Feel free to change or add comments to the Power Point slides. I also encourage any one who wants the pictures to e-mail me and I will send them the originals not in a Power Point format. Additionally if they would like any information about either structure contact me and I get that information. The below contact information is my e-mail address.
Email: rick@safetyeducators.net

(DOWNLOAD HIDDEN HAZARDS PPT HERE)

By Rick Lasky

Part 1: Our Mission

Part 2: The Firefighter

Part 3: The Company Officer

Part 4: The Chief

Part 5: Our Two Families

Part 6: Sweating the Small Stuff

Part 7: Changing Shirts

Part 8: What September 11th Did for Us

Part 9: Ceremonies

What do we have to lose?

The COST of FIRE.

By: Azarang (Ozzie) Mirkhah, P.E., EFO, CBO

Las Vegas Fire & Rescue

 

INTRO to the DOWNLOAD:

 

The National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) 2005 report, "The Total Cost of Fire in the United States", indicates that in 2004, there were 3,925 fire fatalities, and the total property fire loss was $14.5 billion.  This total property loss, was just a small portion of the overall $226 billion to $272 billion total cost of fire in America, which was roughly about 2 to 2.5 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product (gdp). To put the magnitude of these statistics in perspective, comparison with some current significant national issues might be of value.   Most don’t know, but the total cost of fire in our country in 2004, was a little more than the gdp of the largest oil producing country in the world, Saudi Arabia.  According to the World Bank’s 2004 statistics, Saudi Arabia’s total gdp in 2004 was about $251 billion.  Think about this next time around you are paying about three dollars a gallon, filling your gas tank!

 

As a proud member of our country’s fire service, I recognize the importance of our mission to reduce the fire fatalities and the life-scarring fire injuries in our communities.  I also believe that it is our professional obligation and patriotic duty to acknowledge our responsibility in decreasing our country's total fire cost...PLEASE CLICK BELOW FOR THE DOCUMENT:

 

 

 

FREE: FIREFIGHTER SURVIVAL POSTER DOWNLOADS 
 
.....Just one more reason to show we care! Sometimes a picture or a poster is worth a thousand words! These downloadable posters can be used to remind your members of what is important...wherever they are: Bulletin Boards, Mail Pickup Areas, Social Areas, Kitchens, Dens, Bathrooms (over the urinals-yeah-just like at the sports bar!) or in the stalls for the 50% of you that have no option.
THE POINT IS: Get this stuff out there and keep it in their faces 24/7. It can't hurt and all it can do is increase our chances of survival so that EVERYONE GOES HOME!
 
DOWNLOAD POSTERS:
FREE HIGHWAY SAFETY TRAINING VIDEOS

(Thanks to Jack Sullivan from www.ResponderSafety.com for providing the below info!)

I am constantly being asked where fire department training and safety
officers can get good visual aids to utilize in their highway incident
safety training efforts. For once I have some great news about some
additional resources that are now available to anyone, hassle free.

Two videos that can be used in your training efforts on the subject of
highway incident management and safety are now available as a FREE download
through the Virginia Department of Transportation website at
<http://www.virginiadot.org/>. No registration or cost involved. Simply
right click and "save as". WARNING! These are very large files (over 100MB
each) and the download should be done with the help of a high speed
internet connection.

The two videos are "Hampton Roads (VA) Highway Incident Management" and
"The HATS of Incident Management". Both videos are very well done and the
one on the "HATS" is also very funny even through it deals with a very
serious subject. It is a very effective tape that can be used to promote
Unified Command at a highway incident scene.

In order to view the tapes, go to: <http://www.virginiadot.org/>
Then go to Programs (left side of screen)
Then go to Highway Incident Management (top of right column) - where you
can RIGHT CLICK and SAVE AS the two videos

SPECIAL NOTE! - Ok, if every one of you goes to the website to download the
videos at the same time there are bound to be some bandwidth issues and
possibly some people who will get not available messages. Be patient and if
you can't get in when you first try, bookmark the website address and try
back later.

Many thanks to the folks at VDOT for making these videos available and
special thanks to Jon DuFresne, VDOT, ITS Operations Engineer, for his
efforts to help make this happen. Jon can be reached at
<Jon.DuFresne@VDOT.Virginia.gov> in case you have any questions or want to
thank him for his efforts.

*** FIRE INSTRUCTORS/FIRE OFFICERS & FIREFIGHTERS: ***

The National Fallen Firefighters Foundation Line Of Duty Death Summit Task Force has created
some FREE downloadable PowerPoint slides for your use. These 5 quick and ?to the point? slides
are intended to be presented by you at the start or ending of any training or related gathering of
firefighters to keep a few, basic FIREFIGHTER SAFETY and SURVIVAL ?reminders? in their face!

DOWNLOAD POWERPOINT PRESENTATION

For Additional Information on the NFFF LODD Prevention Initiative--go to www.Firehero.org.
These slides are just the very start of numerous FIREFIGHTER INJURY AND DEATH
PREVENTION Tools and Guides that will be coming out soon from the NFFF.

WHY TRAIN? WHY REVIEW?
WHY STUDY? Here Is Why!!


FF's Fall Thru Floor!!... PowerPoint Slide Program provided so that we ALL CAN LEARN FROM these Firefighters CLOSE CALL!

DOWNLOAD SLIDESHOW

This is a slide show courtesy of several Baltimore County, MD regulars to FirefighterCloseCalls.com. This fire had 2 ff's fall through the floor. Three days later they had a fire right across the street from this house with a similar situation. Ironically we watched this slide show just before at shift change. Going into the basement we knew we needed to be careful of the Trusses. We put the fire out and evacuated the basement for fear of collapse of the first floor. No one was injured and everyone went home. WHY? TRAINING! THATS WHY. Make EVERY DAY A TRAINING DAY so... EVERYONE COMES HOME.

***** STRUCK ON THE ROADWAYS! ***** 
WHY WE MUST PROTECT OUR MEMBERS ON THE ROADWAYS!

FFCC.COM NOTES:
It's NO SECRET that the roadways and highways can be as HAZARDOUS to us anything else we get involved with. The DANGER in operating on the roadways and highways can only be MINIMIZED by developing a PLAN so everyone KNOWS what the rules will be, who will be where, who will be closing the road (or NOT) and who and what will be BLOCKING the roadways. The plan must be developed and trained on in cooperation w/ the responding police agency (highway patrol, sheriff, city police etc) as well as any other responders you deal with.


THE ROADWAYS AND HIGHWAYS ARE DANGEROUS-EXPECT
THE UNEXPECTED AND PREPARE FOR THE WORST.

 

These actual video clips will help you DRIVE THE POINT HOME for the nonbelievers!


clip 1 | clip2 | clip3 | clip 4 | clip 5

ALSO.... check out these great resources to PREVENT the above:
Responder Safety | NIOSH | Mike Wilbur's Emergency Vehicle Response

CLUSTER HOME FIREFIGHTING!
In many SUBURBAN (and soon to be suburban) areas, developers are trying to CRAM in as many homes per acre as possible....and the politicians are allowing it. And who is left holding this "One LB bag loaded with 10 lbs of "stuff"...? WE ARE.
Our THANKS to the folks at Prince William County, Virginias'  DALE CITY VFD for this excellent PowerPoint program that helps define some strategic considerations for firefighters when having to plan on operating at CLUSTER HOME fires.
A RAPID PRE-INTERVENTION PROGRAM!
This "quick hit" PowerPoint program was sent to us from the Washington Twp, FD near Columbus, Ohio. It is designed to be a "get focused program" for company officers to use w/their personnel and (like all this stuff) coincide with "get out of the recliners" hands-on training. This is a GREAT example of a FD taking some stuff from our site (and others) and USING IT to keep firefighters focused on the critical importance of the job. That's what FirefighterCloseCalls.com is for.
Download PowerPoint Presentation
Notification

USE OF INFORMATION FROM FirefighterCloseCalls.com and The Secret List should be passed along to FIREFIGHTERS and those who support (or are supposed to support!) us! Credit shall be given to www.firefighterclosecalls.com and if you are truly committed to firefighter safety, that should be no problem. If you aren't, and you don't give us credit and try to prostitute this stuff as your own, we'll find you and expose you. We Promise. Odd's are... our mailing list is bigger than yours!

Recent Issue of Secret List

Posters
Click to Print

 

YOU NEED THIS BOOK!
(Trust Us)

400+ PAGES.
90+ CONTRIBUTORS!
100% of the royalties from the sales of "PASS IT ON" will be donated to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and the Chief Ray Downey Scholarship Fund.
CLICK ABOVE TO ORDER YOUR COPIES TODAY!